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Caradon Community Network Panel to discuss highways maintenance and electoral review

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Fri, 19/01/2018 - 14:01

People in the Caradon Community Network area can hear about highways maintenance and the latest on Cornwall Council’s electoral review at the Caradon Community Network Panel meeting on Thursday 1 February. 

The meeting takes place at 6.30pm in the Council Chamber at the Callington Town Council Offices.

Paul Allen, CORMAC’S Highways and Environment Manager, will provide an overview of CORMAC’s highways service standards, including how repairs are managed and how people can report highways defects. 

There will also be an update on the electoral review, which aims to ensure that all Cornwall councillors represent a similar number of voters.  This is the first electoral review in Cornwall since the creation of the unitary council in 2009, and any changes will come into effect with the 2021 Cornwall Council elections.

The meeting includes a discussion about proposals to give local communities a greater voice through the Caradon Community Network Panel.  In addition, there will be updates on local policing and neighbourhood planning, as well as local matters from Cornwall councillors.

Cornwall Councillor Andrew Long, Chair of Caradon Community Network Panel, said: “Come and join us and find out about local issues in the Caradon Community Network area, including how roads are maintained and how you can report any highways issues.  You can also catch up on plans to give communities more say in the things that affect them and what’s happening with the electoral review.”

The Caradon Community Network Panel meets every two months to discuss matters that affect the local area and to progress these by working in partnership with Cornwall Council and its partners, including town and parish councils, the voluntary and community sector, and the police and health services. Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues. 

Caradon Community Network Panel includes all five Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the following parishes: Callington, Calstock, Linkinhorne, Pillaton, South Hill, St Dominick, St Ive, St Mellion and Stoke Climsland.

The agenda and more information about the panel are available on our Caradon Community Network page.  The meeting is open to the public and everyone is welcome.

Story posted 19 January 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

Radiotherapy Services in Cornwall

In recent weeks, George has been contacted by many constituents about NHS England’s consultation on a new model for radiotherapy services in England. He is concerned about reports of people potentially having to travel outside of Cornwall for treatment.

George wrote the above letter to Simon Stevens, Chief Executive, NHS England, to express those concerns. He has also spoken to the Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group.

Deep rut, 18th January

The whole of this road is seriously rutted there are deep holes where examinations grates etc, the whole road in serious need of resurfacing
Nearest road to the pin placed on the map (automatically generated by Bing Maps): 3 Treswithian Road, Camborne
Report on FixMyStreet
Categories: FixMyStreet

St Blazey, Fowey and Lostwithiel Community Network Panel meeting to discuss highways maintenance and anti-social behaviour

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Thu, 18/01/2018 - 14:19

People in and around St Blazey, Fowey and Lostwithiel area are being invited to attend the January meeting of the St Blazey, Fowey and Lostwithiel Community Network Panel. Items on the agenda include highway standards and anti-social behaviour.

The Network Panel meeting will take place on Monday 29 January 2018 between 7pm and 9pm at Squires Field Community Centre, Park Road Fowey, PL23 1EF.

Steve Bayley, the Highway Network Manager from Cormac, will be coming along to explain the standards of roads and schedule for maintaining them, including how a member of the public can report defects.

Helen Toms, Anti-Social Behaviour Caseworker at Cornwall Council, will be briefing the panel on anti-social behaviour policy and legislation. Helen will cover how to report concerns about anti-social behaviour, and give reported levels of anti-social behaviour in the area as well as explaining what’s being done about it through working in partnership with the police.

There will be an update on Cornwall Council’s Cabinet decision last September to strengthen engagement with local communities and give them a greater voice through Community Network Panels. The briefing from Tasha Davis, Community Link Officer for the area, will include progress on empowering panels by giving them more of a say on important local issues.

There will also be round the table updates from Cornwall Councillors and Town and Parish Councils on matters of interest across the network, and opportunity to share experiences.

At the meeting there will be an opportunity for local residents to ask any questions they may have.

St Blazey Cornwall Councillor Pauline Giles and Chair of the St Blazey, Fowey and Lostwithiel Community Network Panel said: “I strongly encourage those who live or work in the area to come along to the St Blazey, Fowey and Lostwithiel Community Network Panel meeting and find out more about highways standards and anti-social behaviour. These Panels meetings are an important way for people to find out more about their local community and hear updates from Town, Parish and Cornwall Councillors - and also have a say.”

The St Blazey, Fowey and Lostwithiel Network Panel meets quarterly to discuss matters that affect the local area. They progress these by working in partnership with Cornwall Council and its partners; including town and parish councils, the voluntary and community sector, and the police and health services.

Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues.

The St Blazey, Fowey and Lostwithiel Community Network Panel includes all five Cornwall Councillors for the area, representatives of the eight Parish Councils (Boconnoc, Broadoak, Lanlivery, Luxulyan, St Sampson, St Veep, St Winnow and Tywardreath and Par) and three Town Councils (Fowey, Lostwithiel, St Blaise) in the community network area.

More information about the Community Network Panels and dates for future meetings can be found on the Cornwall Council Community Networks webpage. 

Posted 18 January 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

Lostwithiel man pleads guilty to fly-tipping

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Thu, 18/01/2018 - 12:06

Gary Coles (32) of Pendour Park, Lostwithiel pleaded guilty at Bodmin Magistrates Court on 11 January 2018 to fly-tipping in a country lane just outside Luxulyan in June 2017 and duty of care offences with respect to failure to hold a waste carriers licence and failure to produce relevant waste transfer documentation.

Mr Coles was fined £300 and ordered to pay costs of £302. 

The area where Mr Coles fly-tipped the items was known to Cornwall Council Community Protection Officers as a local fly-tipping ‘hot spot’ and was being monitored.  

Mr Coles took waste from a household after being approached to remove it for a fee.  

Cornwall Council receive around 4000 reports of fly tipping on public and private land a year. The cost of collecting and disposing of the fly-tipped waste costs tax payers hundreds of thousands of pounds each year.

Lynn Carter from Cornwall Council’s Public Protection service said: “Cornwall Council continues to work hard to tackle issues of fly-tipping. Fly-tipping is not only unsightly but costs the Council thousands of pounds each year to clear up the mess. We will continue to respond, investigate and, where evidence is found, take the appropriate enforcement action.”

Cornwall Council cabinet member for environment and public protection Sue James said: “Cornwall Council continues to do everything possible to challenge fly-tipping. As this case demonstrates, it is important that people paying contractors to dispose of waste undertake the necessary checks to ensure that the contractor is permitted to transport the waste.  The contractor must provide the customer with waste transfer notes to ensure that their legal duties are complete.”

Story posted 16 January 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

Food operator prosecuted for illegal crab processing business

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Thu, 18/01/2018 - 12:05

Gary Beynon, the Food Business Operator of Cornish Finest Crab has received a two year conditional discharge at a hearing on 11 January 2018 at Bodmin Magistrates Court. Mr Beynon was also ordered to pay costs of £4291.

In May 2017, Cornwall Council Food Officers discovered that several businesses were being supplied with cooked crab meat in the St Austell and Charlestown area. Subsequent investigations established that Mr Beynon had been illegally operating a crab processing business for a number of years, without the required food approval to do so. He had also failed to put in place a documented food safety management system, to undertake formal food training, to carry out microbiological sampling on the product and to correctly label the product.

Mr Beynon pleaded guilty to 6 offences including illegally operating a crab processing business without the required approval.

In sentencing, the Magistrates commented that they failed to understand how someone wouldn’t know that they needed to be registered or approved as a food business, particularly when dealing with a high risk product such as crab meat.

Nick Kelly, Cornwall Council Food and Health & Safety Health Manager said “This case highlights the seriousness of someone operating a food business without the legally required approval to do so. I would encourage anyone setting up a food business, particularly one handling high risk food, to contact our Business Regulatory Support team at the outset in order that we can provide the necessary advice. This will help ensure the operation and food product is to a satisfactory and safe standard”.

Sue James, Cornwall Council cabinet member for Environment and Public Protection, said  “Every year, Council officers work with thousands of businesses across Cornwall to check compliance with legal requirements. While the majority of Cornwall businesses do comply, there is no hiding place for those who fail to maintain standards to protect public health, and we will prosecute. Thankfully this is a small number of cases.”

 

Story posted 16 January 2017

Categories: Councils, Politics

Scaffolding in highways, 17th January

Pedestrians walking in highway to avoid scaffolding. Can this be inspected and made safe.

Nearest road to the pin placed on the map (automatically generated by Bing Maps): 42 Cross Street, Camborne
Report on FixMyStreet
Categories: FixMyStreet

Residents and businesses in Cornwall urged to go plastic free

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Tue, 16/01/2018 - 16:12

Cornwall Council’s Cabinet member for Environment and Public Protection is calling for business and residents to join forces with the Council and other organisations to move towards ridding Cornwall of single use plastic. 

The call to action follows the request for retailers to introduce "plastic-free" aisles and the extension of the 5p charge on plastic carrier bags to all retailers in England.

Cornwall Council Cabinet Member for Environment and Public Protection Sue James said the Government’s announcements were a step in the right direction but that doing it dreckly was not going far enough. Councillor James hopes residents and businesses of Cornwall will want to lead the way for the rest of the UK

“I’d personally like to see the end to single use plastics. Imagine if we could be the first county in the United Kingdom to stop the use of single use plastic - making a real step change to protect our beautiful environment and playing our part to reduce the harm to our surrounding seas. I will turn my attention first on Cornwall Council’s estate and services but hope residents will join me by influencing  their local communities and town and parish councils”. 

Cllr James said through Cornwall Council’s partnership with Clean Cornwall we will invite Cornwall businesses to come together to discuss what can be done to eliminate the use of plastic in Cornwall.

“Penzance is already a pioneer in this area and recently became the first town in the UK to be awarded plastic free status as part of a campaign run by Surfers Against Sewage. The town has shops, cafes and visitor attractions reducing single-use plastics and residents taking part in beach cleans. This is a conversation I want to see spread across Cornwall.

“Less plastic waste means less to dispose of, which saves money and resources, and it’s better for the environment and wildlife. 

“I’d like to see all local producers ensure they only use plastic packaging where there is absolutely no alternative and ensure that what they use is easily recycled. 

“The more we can do to support the local community to reduce the use of plastic in the first place, the more we will keep Council costs down for residents. This is a real opportunity for local businesses, producers and supermarket chains in Cornwall to make Cornwall plastic free.

We are really proud of our environment in Cornwall – it’s one of our greatest assets and we need to do all we can to protect it from plastic pollution. The results of a recent recycling survey showed that 91 per cent of Cornwall’s residents felt that it was very important that Cornwall’s environment was protected.  This is a key issue for people and we need to stand up and take action.

“In Cornwall last year households recycled 3077 tonnes of plastic, but threw away 2095 tonnes (within their weekly rubbish collection bags). That means 41% of plastic created by households wasn’t recycled that could have been!

“I’d like to urge residents to think about the products they buy and the packaging that comes with them. Could you choose a version with no plastic packaging or ask your local retailer to reduce their plastic waste? It all helps,” she said.

Cllr James said China’s recent decision to impose a ban on 'foreign waste' as part of a drive to upgrade its industries highlighted the importance of all local authorities looking at more sustainable ways to manage waste by helping to change the behaviours and practices of businesses and consumers.

“While waste from Cornwall is not sent directly to China, new approaches to Resources and Waste management have momentum around the world. Whether plastic waste is sent to the UK, Portugal or China, it’s not sustainable for any local authority to keep managing increasing levels of plastic waste, the costs of which are borne by the taxpayer.” she said.

Story posted on 16 January 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

Accountable Care System Inquiry – day three round up

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Tue, 16/01/2018 - 15:30

Councillors have heard from senior health officers about the preferred options for the integrated strategic commissioning of health and social care in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly during the latest session of the Accountable Care System Inquiry.

During the inquiry, the panel - made up of six Cornwall councillors led by Chairman Dr Andy Virr - heard from the Council’s Director of Public Health, Dr Caroline Court and Helen Childs, Interim Chief Operating Officer for NHS Kernow Clinical Commissioning Group (NHS Kernow).



Their evidence focussed on a desktop assessment of the six options for the future strategic commissioning of health and social care services which had been carried out by a group of senior officers from Cornwall Council, the Council of the Isles of Scilly, NHS Kernow and NHS England. The group had ranked the options which range from keeping the arrangements as they are at present to moving to strategic commissioning of health, social care and public health services through a new body such as a Joint Health and Care Committee. View the presentation with more information about how the options have been ranked.

With three of the four inquiry sessions now completed, councillors are making good process in understanding the current challenges for health and social care in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly, said Dr Virr.

"Both we and our colleagues in the NHS are agreed that the way health and social care services are currently commissioned in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly won’t address the changing need of our communities. Our role is to consider the options put forward for integrated strategic commissioning and how this can be achieved," said Dr Virr.

"After the final inquiry session, we will consider the evidence and make our recommendation to the Council's Health and Social Care Scrutiny Committee, who will then consider our findings and make recommendations to the Cabinet. Any decision on this will ultimately rest with the 123 councillors who make up Cornwall’s elected representatives on the Council."

Developing an ACS for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly is a way of bringing together the network of existing statutory health and care providers and commissioners. An ACS does not change an organisation’s statutory and legal responsibilities, and will allow for one strategy, one budget and one plan approach to work together in people’s best interests, rather than those of each organisation.

As well as being in agreement about the approach, all are signed up to making progress and testing out the practicalities by working in shadow form during 2018/2019.

There are four sessions taking place as part of the Accountable Care System Inquiry – the final session takes place at 10am on Wednesday 31 January.

You can submit comments for the panel to consider while weighing up the evidence – please email healthcommittee@cornwall.gov.uk by 12noon on Wednesday 17 January.

Categories: Councils, Politics

BBC apologises to Cornwall Council and CORMAC for breach of editorial standards

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Tue, 16/01/2018 - 15:22

Cornwall Council and CORMAC, the company owned by Cornwall Council which maintains Cornwall’s roads, welcome the apology broadcast on BBC Radio Cornwall today (16 January 2018). In the apology the BBC acknowledges that the BBC’s failure to give CORMAC and the Council an opportunity to respond during a phone in programme in May 2016 breached BBC editorial standards.

The complaint made to the BBC arose after a number of false and damaging statements were made during the live broadcast which we believe were detrimental to the reputations of Cornwall Council and CORMAC, to the people that work for these organisations and to Cornwall itself. BBC Radio Cornwall has apologised to Cornwall Council and to CORMAC for the failure to offer them an opportunity to respond to the statements broadcast and for the unfairness to them that this failure caused.  The BBC also apologises for the lengthy delay in resolving the editorial standards complaint.

Cornwall Council and CORMAC welcome the apology and the BBC’s acknowledgement of its lapse in editorial standards but remain disappointed that the inaccurate statements clearly made on air will not be corrected.

BBC apology  

In May 2016 we broadcast a phone-in about CORMAC, the company owned by Cornwall Council which maintains Cornwall’s roads.  The phone-in included a number of comments which CORMAC and the Council regard as factually inaccurate and unfair to them.  Although we believe it was justifiable to broadcast them, they amounted to the kind of criticism which CORMAC and the Council should have had a timely opportunity to respond to. We acknowledge that we should have given CORMAC and the Council such an opportunity, and that our failure to do so breached BBC editorial standards. Radio Cornwall would like to apologise for the unfairness to them which this caused, and the BBC would like to apologise for the lengthy delay in resolving their complaint.

The complaint summary is published on the BBC website.

 

Story posted 16 January 2018 

Categories: Councils, Politics
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