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‘Making Space for Nature’ and Smartline projects on the agenda for the Camborne, Pool, Illogan and Redruth Community Network Panel

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Thu, 09/11/2017 - 14:06

Residents of the Camborne, Pool, Illogan and Redruth (CPIR) Community Network Panel area are invited to the November meeting of the CPIR Community Network Panel. Items on the agenda include the ‘Making Space for Nature’ and Smartline projects as well as a presentation about strengthening community networks.

All are invited to attend the CPIR Community Network Panel meeting which takes place on Wednesday 22 November between 7pm and 9pm at Pool Innovation Centre, Pool.

Melissa Ralph and Lisa Pender, from Cornwall Council’s Green infrastructure for Growth project, will be attending the panel to give a presentation about the ‘Making Space for Nature Project.’ Cornwall Council has secured funding for the project which will see a major investment in local urban green spaces across a number of Cornish towns as part of the Green Infrastructure for Growth (GI4G) project. £3.5 million will be spent over the next 3 years on public recreational areas, roadside verges and old churchyards to make them better places for people and for wildlife. Seven Cornish towns have been identified to receive investment through GI4G including Camborne, Pool and Redruth.

Coastline Housing will also be attending the Panel to discuss Smartline, an exciting research project looking at how technology can be used to help us live healthier and happier lives. The partnership project is led by the University of Exeter with Coastline Housing Ltd, Cornwall Council and Volunteer Cornwall.

In addition there will be a briefing on Cornwall Council’s Cabinet decision on 6 September to strengthen engagement with local communities and give them a greater voice through Community Network Panels. The briefing from Edwina Hannaford, Cabinet Member for Neighbourhoods will include information on empowering panels by giving them more of a say on important local issues.

At the meeting there will be an opportunity for local residents to ask any questions they may have.

Cornwall Councillor Ian Thomas, Chair of Camborne, Pool, Illogan and Redruth Community Network Panel, said: “The Camborne, Pool, Illogan and Redruth Community Network Panel is a great opportunity for local residents and businesses to ask questions about local issues so please do come along and take part.”

The Camborne, Pool, Illogan and Redruth Community Network Panel meets quarterly to discuss matters that affect the local community and to agree priorities that can be delivered by Cornwall Council and other agencies including the police and health services. Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues.

The panel comprises all fourteen Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives from the ten parishes in the Camborne, Redruth, Illogan and Pool Community Network - Camborne Pendarves, Camborne Roskear, Camborne Trelowarren, Camborne Treslothan, Camborne Treswithian, Carharrack, Gwennap and St Day, Four Lanes, Illogan, Lanner and Stithians, Mount Hawke and Portreath, Pool and Tehidy, Redruth Central, Redruth North and Redruth South.

More information about the Community Network Panels and dates for future meetings can be found on the Cornwall Council Community Networks webpage

Story posted 09 November 2017

Categories: Councils, Politics

Council gears up to keep Cornwall safe this winter

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Thu, 09/11/2017 - 13:14

With the winter approaching, Cornwall’s gritters are on standby to deal with forecasts for ice and snow.

Having put together the annual winter service plan, the Council and CORMAC are reminding members of the public to make sure that they drive safely according to the road and weather conditions. 

Why do we salt roads?


The Council is responsible for over 7,520 kilometres (4,530 miles) of roads – one of the largest road networks in the country - ranging from principal roads to narrow country lanes.  Last year the authority spent £1million keeping Cornwall’s roads safe during the winter with the fleet of gritting lorries using 5,300 tonnes of salt on the 53 days when gritting took place. 

The authority carries out precautionary salting on 25 routes covering around 1,400 km (875 miles) of the road network, including the most heavily trafficked A and B roads in Cornwall which, between them, are responsible for around 85% of traffic movements.  On behalf of the Council, CORMAC also treats the roads to key sites such as hospitals, minor injury units, ambulance and fire stations, bus stations and secondary schools.  The routes to, and the circulatory system within, Liskeard Railway Station, St Austell Railway and Bus Station, St Ives Malakof Bus Station and Penzance Bus Station, are also included in gritting schedule as well as the roads to a further 10 health or community centres – Callington, Camborne, Falmouth, Gunnislake, Helston, Mullion, Saltash, St Keverne, Tintagel and Truro – adding a further 1,140 metres to the salting network.

How does the Council decide when to send out the gritters?



The A30 from the boundary with Devon to Penzance and the A38, which are the main trunk roads through Cornwall, are the responsibility of Highways England which manages its own winter service. Highways England uses Cornwall Council’s salt barns as the base for its own gritting operations.

It takes around three hours to treat each of the Council’s 25 pre salting routes.  CORMAC staff are on standby 24 hours a day, seven days a week – including Christmas Day - to enable them to respond to emergency situations at very short notice.

The salt used by the Council is provided from salt mines in Northern Ireland.  Every year the Council pre orders salt which is then stored in a number of covered barns based in highways depots throughout Cornwall. It currently has around 16,000 tonnes of salt ready for use this winter stored at seven locations across Cornwall and will, as usual, buy additional stock during the winter months if required.

Salting of roads is a precautionary treatment to reduce the freezing point of water in frosty conditions and is designed to reduce the possibility of skidding or more serious accidents.  However it is important to remember that even on pre-treated roads salting will not stop heavy snow from settling and sleet, hail and rain can cause problems with the salt being washed off the road.  It will also not prevent the formation of black ice when rain falls on sub zero roads.

“We usually aim to carry out salting before freezing occurs but Cornwall’s climate means that we are often faced with the problem of near freezing temperatures combined with showers” said Andy Stevenson, the Council’s Head of Highways. “If the salt is washed off roads which have been treated by subsequent rain, sleet or hail showers, the road surfaces are likely to freeze. We can never guarantee that roads will be free of ice and would urge all drivers to ensure that they drive according to the existing road and weather conditions.”

CORMAC staff monitor the weather conditions throughout the day and night, liaising closely with forecasters specifically employed for this task.  They also use information from 22 roadside sensors which measure road surface temperature and other factors such as salt levels, precipitation, air temperature, dew point and wind speed which is then relayed back to both the forecasters and highways staff.  This information is used to decide if and when to carry out the pre-salting treatments.

Geoff Brown, Cornwall Council’s Cabinet Member for Transport, said “Although the Council and other agencies work hard to manage winter weather please check forecasts before you travel.

“Don’t assume a road has been treated, drive carefully and think of others – it can take up to ten times longer to stop in icy conditions so please reduce speed and keep a reasonable distance between yourself and other vehicles, look out for pedestrians and cyclists and, be especially careful on minor roads, driving according to the weather and road conditions you are experiencing – a road can be treacherously icy, especially in the morning, even if the sun is shining.

“If you find a dangerous situation on any road please – safely – let the Council know.”

Top tips for preparing for winter driving


This year as in previous years, the Council will be using Twitter (@CornwallCouncil) to provide information about disruptions to services such as school closures caused by the snow and ice. Information on school closures is also available on our website

You can also follow @CormacLtd on Twitter for details of when the gritters will be going out across Cornwall.

Categories: Councils, Politics

Cornwall Council confirms further savings will be needed in budget

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Wed, 08/11/2017 - 16:53

Cornwall Council today confirmed it is facing a budget gap with £75 million savings needing to be found over the next four years.

Deputy Leader of Cornwall Council Julian German said uncertainties around Brexit, social care funding and welfare reforms all add to a complex picture.

“Like other local authorities across the country, Cornwall Council is facing less funding from central Government, as well as increased pressure as a result of rising demand for services. This means that despite the £300 million savings we have already made, we still have considerable savings to find in the years to come.

“The main grant we receive from central government will be significantly reduced by 2019/20, so we need to find additional ways to fund services. At the same time, demand for our services continues to rise year on year, particularly those services for vulnerable children and adults.

“Cornwall Council provides a huge range of essential services to the people of Cornwall. When times are tough, it is more important than ever to spend resources wisely.

“Each year we prioritise spending on services that make sure children and young people get the best start in life, that communities feel the benefit of economic growth and that support vulnerable residents to live independently.

“To continue to do this we need to make difficult decisions about council tax and we have to look at reducing services.”

Councillor German said the Council would continue to look for ways to improve services, making them more efficient and prioritising frontline services.

“The challenges we face, while difficult, are something we can address with community support. Over the past few years you have told us what you thought about our proposals for savings. Your feedback, thoughts and suggestions have informed the decisions about the budget we have set each year.

“Our aspiration for the future is for people, organisations and businesses to work together to ensure that residents continue to receive the services they need.”

Cornwall Council runs a large number of services including schools, social services, rubbish collection, roads, planning, trading standards, fire and rescue and more. The draft budget for 2018-2022 will be discussed by the Cornwall Council Cabinet on Wednesday 15 November. Members of the public can attend the meeting or watch the webcast live from 10am on Wednesday 15 November. After the meeting, public feedback will be sought on the budget proposals until the end of the year. The final budget is submitted to full Council for decision in February 2018.

Story posted 8 November 2017

Categories: Councils, Politics

Highway maintenance and strengthening community networks on the agenda for the West Penwith Community Network Panel meeting

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Wed, 08/11/2017 - 15:11

Residents of the West Penwith Community Network Panel area are invited to the November meeting of the West Penwith Community Network Panel. Items on the agenda will include highway maintenance, strengthening community networks, local police liaison and Coastal Community Teams.

The meeting will take place on Thursday 16 November 2017, between 7.00pm and 8.30pm, in St John's Hall, Alverton Street, Penzance.

James Hardy, Cornwall Council Community Link Officer for West Penwith, will provide an update on Coastal Community Teams and their local projects as well as providing a briefing on Cornwall Council’s Cabinet decision on 6 September to strengthen engagement with local communities and give them a greater voice through Community Network Panels. The briefing will include information on empowering panels by giving them more of a say on important local issues.

In addition officers from Cornwall Council’s Highways & Environment team will be attending the meeting to provide an update on highways maintenance. An officer from Devon and Cornwall Police will also be attending the meeting to discuss the establishment of the Police Liaison group.

The Panel will have an opportunity to ask any questions and give feedback. 

Cornwall Councillor Sue Nicholas, Chair of the West Penwith Community Network Panel, said: “The Community Network Panel is a great opportunity for Town and Parish representatives alongside local residents to find out more, and ask questions about  issues on a local level. I welcome everyone to come along and be part of the discussion.”

The West Penwith Community Network Panel meets bi-monthly to discuss matters that affect the local area and to progress these by working in partnership with Cornwall Council and its partners, including town & parish councils, the voluntary and community sector, and the police and health services.

The panel comprises all nine Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the 15 Town and Parish Councils in the West Penwith Community Network - Ludgvan, Madron, Marazion, Morvah, Paul, Penzance, Perranuthnoe, Sancreed, Sennen, St. Buryan, St. Hilary, St. Just In Penwith, St. Levan, St. Michael's Mount and Zennor.

More information about the Community Network Panels and dates for future meetings  can be found on the Cornwall Council Community Networks webpage

Story posted 8 November 2017

Categories: Councils, Politics

Council commissions work to encourage investment in Cornwall

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Wed, 08/11/2017 - 13:51

Cornwall Council today stood by the decision to commission work which will help attract millions of pounds of investment into Cornwall.

Council Leader Adam Paynter said it was important for Cornwall to have a competitive edge to create more jobs and bring new business investment to Cornwall.

“The reality is that Cornwall is facing a future with less EU funding post Brexit and we need to look at private sector support to secure a sustainable future for the people of Cornwall. 

“We have the second fastest-growing tech sector in the country, we’re building a world-leading aerospace industry, we’re the headquarters for huge social enterprises like the Eden Project and we have an ever growing food industry that would be the pride of many other areas of the UK. These are the assets we need to tell the world about and show why it is a good decision to invest here.

“We need to attract investment to provide well paid local jobs, grow businesses, and contribute more in business rates which will in turn help us deliver more local services and build more homes and infrastructure.”

President of Cornwall Chamber of Commerce Toby Parkins said: “International companies need a clear prospectus of what Cornwall has to offer. One of our challenges is how we move beyond the Poldark and pasties view of Cornwall to gain a competitive edge and build an identity in the way that places like the Northern Powerhouse and Hull have. We have to be innovative and outward thinking in how we do this.”

The work, which was secured through an open and competitive tender and is not yet complete, was informed by more than 126 meetings, focus groups and consultations were held with business, public agencies, councillors and council officers representing research and innovation, community and voluntary sector, environment and climate, agri-business, transport and infrastructure, tourism, culture and heritage.

The project will cost £75,000 and is co-funded by the LEP and the Council. Recommendations to create a strategic vision for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly were considered at full Council on 6 October 2016. 

Story posted 8 November 2017

Categories: Councils, Politics

Council calls for fair changes to UK immigration policy after Brexit

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Wed, 08/11/2017 - 12:31

Cornwall Council is calling on the Government to make sure future migration laws deliver the right skills for the Cornish economy to prosper after we exit the EU -  with new research showing that Cornish farms are already unable to fully harvest crops this year due to a sharp fall in migrant labour. 

Recent research commissioned by Cornwall Council and the Local Enterprise Partnership found changes to migration laws after Brexit could lead to multi-million pound losses to the Cornish economy if the horticultural industry can’t access the skills and workforce it needs.  The research found that following the Brexit vote, recruitment immediately became more difficult for horticultural farms, harvests could not be lifted in full and staffing requirements were already dwindling to 65% of need.

Around 17,000 EU nationals are estimated to be living and working in Cornwall -  approximately three per cent of the total population.  There is no evidence that migrant labour is displacing the local workforce.

David Simmons of Riviera Produce, one of the biggest producers in Cornwall predicted dire impacts: “If we put strict limits on Eastern European migrant labour or devise alternative immigration policies that limit so-called ‘low-skilled’ labour, the Cornish horticultural industry is finished.”

Council Leader Adam Paynter called for Government to take a place-based approach to future migration and workforce. “Many of our major industries such as horticulture could be severely impacted and are already feeling the pinch with some of our crops rotting in the fields following a sharp fall in the number of EU workers.

“We are working with local partners to improve skills and employment for local people, but there will always be an important place in the Cornish economy for seasonal and migrant workers, particularly in the horticultural industry. We are calling on the Government to take a place-based approach to future migration, to make sure that the Cornish economy has access to skills which may not be highly valued in London but which are vital to a major rural economy like ours”.

Sandra Rothwell, chief executive of the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Enterprise Partnership said: “What this study demonstrates is that there are parts of the Cornish economy that are heavily reliant on migrant labour and that any  emerging policy on movement of EU nationals must take this into account. We cannot afford a one-size fits all solution or the continued uncertainty that has already started to blight the labour market.”

Read the Council's full response to the Migration Advisory Committee on EEA workers

Story posted 8 November 2017

Categories: Councils, Politics

Facebook group RSS feed

Using Wallflux.com you can access the RSS-feed of your Facebook group. This is the demonstration message at the Regular Wallflux Feed for a Facebook group ID. #1427665177484300.

Photo: Hayle Christmas Market 2017

Lauren Bambury shared Hayle Christmas Market 2017's post to the group: Hayle development discussion group. (6 likes)

Governing Body meeting

NHS Cornwall Events - Tue, 07/11/2017 - 10:00
Information on NHS Kernow's November Governing Body meeting.
Categories: Health

Invitation to hear from South West Water at the Truro and Roseland Community Network Panel meeting

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Tue, 07/11/2017 - 08:47

Residents of the Truro and Roseland Community Network area are being invited to attend the November meeting of the Truro and Roseland Community Network Panel. Items on the agenda include South West Water and plans to give local communities more say on local issues.

All are invited to attend the Network Panel meeting which takes place on Tuesday 14 November 2017 between 7pm and 9pm at Richard Lander School, Truro.

Representatives from South West Water will be attending to answer panel members’ questions and explaining the existing sewage treatment network systems. They will explain South West Water’s plan to cope with future development in relation to waste water (sewage) and the large scale proposed developments to the West of Truro.

There will be a briefing on Cornwall Council’s Cabinet decision on 6 September to strengthen engagement with local communities and give them a greater voice through Community Network Panels. The briefing from Mark O’Brien, Community Link Officer for the network area, will include information on empowering panels by giving them more of a say on important local issues.

At the meeting there will be an opportunity for local residents to ask any questions they may have. There will also be details on how people can give their views on what services are important to them and the Council’s draft budget proposals for next year at public engagement sessions in November and December.

Chris Wells Chairman of the Truro and Roseland Community Network Panel and a Truro City Councillor said: “Everyone is invited to attend November’s Truro and Roseland Community Network Panel meeting and hear from South West Water. These panel meetings are good way for local people to find out more about what’s happening in their local community and to have their say. Everyone’s welcome to come along and find out more.”

The Truro and Roseland Panel meets bi-monthly to discuss matters that affect the local area. They progress these by working in partnership with Cornwall Council and its partners; including town & parish councils, the voluntary and community sector, and the police and health services. Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues.

The Truro and Roseland Community Network Panel includes all ten Cornwall Councillors for the area, representatives of Truro City Council and the 18 Parish Councils in the community network: Chacewater, Cuby, Feock, Gerrans, Grampound with Creed, Kea, Kenwyn, Ladock, Philleigh, Probus, Ruan Lanihorne, St Clement, St Erme, St Just-in-Roseland, St Michael Caerhays, St Michael Penkevil, Tregony and Veryan.

People can keep up to date with what’s happening in this area by joining the Truro and Roseland Community Network Area page: www.facebook.com/TruroRoselandCNA.

More information about the Community Network Panels and dates for future meetings can be found on the Cornwall Council Community Networks webpage. 

Posted 7 November 2017

Categories: Councils, Politics

Truro Safe donations used to help those most in need

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Mon, 06/11/2017 - 16:16

The kind contributions from those who have given to one of Truro Safe Donations Points are being used by local organisations to directly help people on the City’s streets.

The Truro Safe Partnership consists of services from Cornwall Council along with Truro City Council, Devon and Cornwall Police, Truro BID, Truro Street Pastors and other local representatives; and is coordinated by the Council’s Community Link Officer.

In April the Truro Safe Partnership launched donation points across Truro making it easy for people to donate money to the charities supporting vulnerable individuals to move away from a life on the streets.

Along with the donation points Truro Safe distributed an information leaflet across the city called ‘Different Issues, The Same Streets’ for businesses, locals and visitors. This explains how the partners are responding to the different issues of street drinking, begging and rough sleeping by providing on the ground assertive outreach support to help individuals make positive changes.

To remind people that the work of the Partnership is ongoing Truro Safe are redistributing the leaflet across the city.

The Truro Safe partners also recently agreed that the collections from the Donation Points will go to St. Petroc’s and New Start so they can buy some essential kit to give to those assessed as most in need.

Steve Ellis, Chief Executive of St Petroc’s Society, commented that: “Cornwall currently has the third highest number of rough sleepers/street homeless in the UK. St Petroc’s has long recognised that only through partnership working will we be able to effectively reduce these numbers and then ensure that they do not grow again in the future. The Truro Safe Partnership is a great innovation and the thoughtful donations have meant that we’ve been able to buy items to help meet individuals’ needs.”

On behalf of Devon and Cornwall Police, Acting Inspector for Truro Jason Adams added that: “This is an excellent example of bringing partners together to find a long term solution to protect some of the most vulnerable in our society. The generosity of the people of Cornwall and beyond is integral to the success of this project, especially as we move towards the winter period.”

Cornwall Councillor Bert Biscoe, Divisional Member for Truro Boscawen: “Life on the street is often very complicated, needing many different things to occur to provide meaningful help to people. This is an opportunity to share the donated cash to help them.”

There are currently eight donation boxes being hosted by businesses in the City including at the Visit Truro tourist office on Boscawen Street, NatWest, Warrens Bakery in High Cross, Superdry, Sole Place, Wetherspoons, Tesco and Truro Methodist Church. Extra donation boxes have been ordered so that other local businesses and venues can get involved.

The partnership is continuing to meet regularly to ensure that anyone who finds themselves on the streets is provided with the most appropriate accommodation and support that helps them to address their needs.   

Truro Safe is part of Safer Cornwall the statutory body aiming to improve community safety across Cornwall. The on-the-ground assertive outreach work to support rough sleepers and vulnerable individuals is ongoing and taking place, via the Safer Cornwall partnership, in other towns in Cornwall, including St Austell, Penzance and Camborne.

For more information about Truro Safe and for a copy of the Same Issues, Different Streets leaflet visit http://safercornwall.co.uk/make-a-difference/truro/.

If you’re a business that would like to host a Truro Safe donation box please contact Truro BID on 01872 273999.

Story posted 6 November 2017

Categories: Councils, Politics

Helston farmer banned from keeping sheep and cattle

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Mon, 06/11/2017 - 16:14

A 76 year old farmer from Cury, Helston has been banned from keeping sheep and cattle following legal action by Cornwall Council.

At Bodmin Magistrates Court on 02 November 2017, Mr Gerald Benney pleaded guilty to:

1)   Failing to dispose of 35 sheep carcasses on 28 March 2017

2)   Causing unnecessary suffering to 5 sheep on 28 March 2017 by failing to treat their lameness

3)   Failing to keep medicine records on 17 August 2017

4)   On 17 August 2017 mutilating ten 5 month old lambs by using a kitchen knife to dock their tails

5)   On 17 August 2017 causing unnecessary suffering to four sheep by failing to treat their lameness.

Mr Benney stated the issues were caused by him suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome and having a heart condition, which meant he rarely left the house during the winter.

District Judge Diana Baker told Mr Benney that the case was one of the worst that she had recently dealt with and if it were not for his age and that he was in poor health, he would have been sent into immediate custody.

Mr Benney was sentenced to four months custody for the welfare offences, two months custody for failing to keep medicine records and one month for failing to dispose of the carcasses.  These were suspended for two years.

He was further disqualified from keeping sheep and cattle for 10 years and ordered to pay the full costs of £6329 within seven days.  A victim surcharge of £115 was also imposed.

Cornwall Council’s  Head of Business Standards and Registration Service, Stuart Benson, said: “This investigation involved some serious animal welfare matters.  Thirty-three lambs were left to die in fields, over 10 ewes had not been treated for severe lameness and in some cases the sheep were walking on bleeding hoofless feet.”

Jonathan McCulloch, Cornwall Council’s Animal Health Inspector who led the case said: “After 19 years I thought I had seen most things, but I was appalled at Mr Benney using a kitchen knife to cut off ten sheep tails. It showed a complete lack of empathy for these animals”. 

Sue James, Cornwall Council cabinet member for Environment and Public Protection said: “Our Animal Health Inspectors normally work with farmers, small holders and businesses across Cornwall to ensure compliance with legislation. However, this serious neglect of animals could not be tolerated.”  

 

Story posted 06 November 2017

Categories: Councils, Politics

Residents offered help to maintain winter wellbeing

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Mon, 06/11/2017 - 15:34

With the nights drawing in and temperatures dropping, residents are being offered help to keep their home warm and well this winter.

Cornwall Council and 30 partner organisations launched a winter wellbeing programme on Friday 3rd November.  Anyone can call a single phone number and get help and advice on insulation, switching energy tariffs to save money, emergency funds for vulnerable people who can’t afford to heat their homes.

Last year the winter wellbeing programme helped over 1,400 homes with advice and support. Sixty-four hospital admissions were avoided and 254 homes were given emergency support to heat their homes.

Dr Caroline Court, Interim Director for Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Public Health said winter wellbeing was a significant problem for many people in Cornwall.

“We have just published our public health annual report which has a strong focus on the connection between homes and people’s health.

“Being able to heat a home is not just about keeping warm. Keeping a house warm and dry helps keep away mould which can make illnesses such as asthma worse. Reducing energy costs and debts can help to reduce stress levels and improve mental wellbeing.

“Keeping warm is vital to staying healthy, particularly for those who are more vulnerable to the cold such as the elderly and people with a long-term health condition. For every £1 that we spend with the Winter Wellbeing programme we help to save the NHS £3.15.”

Cllr Sally Hawken, Cabinet member for Wellbeing and Public Health said one of the Council’s top priorities was to help prevent illness and deaths from the cold weather.

“The winter wellbeing programme has given help to those who need it for the last six years. From setting your heating temperature correctly through to making sure you are on the right energy tariff to draught proofing your home, there are lots of simple things people can do to stay well and warm.”

Joel Williams Lead member for Children, Council of the Isles of Scilly added “This excellent Winter Wellbeing Programme will provide real support and help to our Island Community as we approach another winter.

“Staying warm, together with trying to eat well and taking some exercise when we can, helps us all to stay healthy and active for as long as possible.”

The winter wellbeing guides are available in hard copy at GP surgeries, One Stop Shops, libraries, health centres, dentists, foodbanks, pharmacies and children’s centres or are available to online at http://www.cornwall.gov.uk/winterwellbeing

Story posted 6 November

Categories: Councils, Politics

Cornwall Council pays tribute to Councillor Candy Atherton

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Mon, 06/11/2017 - 09:01

Candy AthertonIt is with deep sadness that Cornwall Council members and staff learnt of the passing of Councillor Candy Atherton, Member for Falmouth Smithick, overnight.

Candy was first elected as the member of parliament for Falmouth and Camborne in 1997, and held the seat with an increased majority in 2001, before being defeated by Liberal Democrat Julia Goldsworthy in 2005.

In 2013 Candy returned to front-line politics, becoming the Cornwall Councillor for the Falmouth Smithick division. She held the seat at this year’s elections in May.

Cornwall Council Chairman Mary May said: “I am shocked and saddened to learn of the death of Councillor Candy Atherton. She was a dedicated, committed and passionate public servant for Cornwall. She always put people first - as an MP she argued with the then Labour Government for adequate funding for Cornwall; she was a driving force behind the Surestart project to give our children the very best start and during her time as a Cornwall Councillor she spoke up for vulnerable people at the Health and Adult Care Scrutiny Committee. Our thoughts and prayers are with her husband Brod and her family as they come to terms with their tragic loss. 

Labour Group Leader Councillor Tim Dwelly also paid tribute to Candy.

“Councillor Candy Atherton’s passing is a huge shock to people. Candy was a remarkable woman and arguably the leading politician in Cornwall’s recent past. A staunch advocate for Cornwall, she was instrumental in lobbying Tony Blair’s Government to secure over £2bn in investment for Cornwall. Many of the things we take for granted today – fibre broadband, the University, new roads, airports and more – have her imprint. She loved Falmouth and worked her socks off for the town. She never stopped championing for her constituents and put a huge amount of energy into everything she did.

She will be deeply missed by us all. I would like to pass my sincerest condolences to her husband Brod, her friends and family at this very difficult time.”

Flags at New County Hall have been lowered to half-mast in respect.

Members and colleagues from across the Council have paid tribute to Councillor Atherton. 

Jude Robinson, former Cornwall Councillor and close friend of Candy Atherton said: “Few people have achieved as much as Candy and her contribution to Cornwall is huge. But on a personal level, she made time for anyone who had a problem and worked as hard for them as she did on any of the big issues. She loved her time on the council for one reason - she felt she could make a difference. Cornwall has lost a great woman and a great friend.” 

Story posted 31 October 2017 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Group wall post by Peter F Clemo

Peter F Clemo wrote on Hayle development discussion group's wall: I've been looking at The Saltings, the tidally flooded area of Hayle Estuary for nigh on 60 years now. It strikes me that it is getting more and more shallow as the years go on. Fair enough it is little or no use except as an area of outstanding beauty and as a bird sanctuary but what happens when it's no longer flooded by the tide and the birds and wildlife are all lost. Will someone have a monster moan at the RSPB for allowing the habitat to be destroyed. Hayle estuary is looking very much in ... (14 likes, 17 comments)

Group wall post by Tracey Dawson

Tracey Dawson wrote on Hayle development discussion group's wall: Nice to see Copperhouse so busy today with the opening of Home Bargains, loads of people on foot using other shops as well as the new shop. Well done Home Bargains for bringing some life back to this end of Hayle and long may it continue x (23 likes, 2 comments)

Pots, tubs and trays plastic recycling now available across the whole of Cornwall

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Fri, 03/11/2017 - 14:12

Residents across Cornwall can now recycle the majority of plastics as pots, tubs and trays have now been added to Cornwall Council recycling services.

Following a successful trial across 46,000 households which saw recycling rates increase, the programme has now been rolled out across the whole of Cornwall in six stages, with West Penwith the last area to come on board.

By 11 November, all Cornwall households will have had at least one collection of plastic pots, tubs and trays.

Councillor Sue James, Cabinet Member for Environment and Public Protection, said the programme was a significant step forward in increasing recycling rates across Cornwall.

"Cornwall's residents now have a door step recycling collection of plastic pots, tubs and trays, which is a major step forward in increasing the amount of waste we recycle.

“This is something that residents have been asking for and which we have received good feedback on. Even more importantly, it will help us meet our longer term target to reduce waste and increase recycling, and it is good for the environment.

“All the plastics collected are sent to a Materials Recycling Facility at either Bodmin or Pool and are then sent on to UK re-processing plants where they can be made into other products such as furniture, drainage pipes or fleeces. That fleece you wear tomorrow could be the yogurt pot you recycled yesterday!”

Tips for recycling tips for pots, tubs and trays

  • Pots, tubs and trays go in the same bag as  plastic bottles.
  • Unfortunately black plastic cannot currently be recycled as the machinery that sorts the plastic by colour cannot see black.
  • Please  rinse and squash  pots, tubs and trays before putting them out for recycling.

More information on recycling pots, tubs and trays and on all recycling collections.

If you haven’t already been recycling, containers are available free. You can order online or by phoning 0300 1234 141

 

Story posted 03 November 2017 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Photo: Hayle Christmas Market 2017

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Hamilton’s Coach Travel customers urged to register financial loss

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Fri, 03/11/2017 - 09:35

Cornwall Council is urging customers of Hamilton’s Coach Travel who have lost money, following the collapse of the St Austell based company in September, to contact the Trustees in Bankruptcy to register their loss.

The Council’s Trading Standards Team is aware that an order for bankruptcy was made against David Hamilton, the sole owner of Hamilton’s Coach Travel based at Trinity Street, St Austell on the 21 September 2017.

Trustees, Stephen Hobson and Lucinda Coleman of Chartered Accountants PKF Francis Clark, have been appointed by the Official Receiver to administer the bankruptcy process.

Gary Webster, Senior Trading Standards Officer at Cornwall Council explained: “We have been liaising with the Trustees in Bankruptcy to identify and support potential customers that may have been left out of pocket. At present, neither the Trustee in Bankruptcy nor Cornwall Trading Standards have been able to fully determine the extent of those affected by the collapse of the business.”

“Those customers who booked holiday packages with the business should have had their monies protected; either through insurance, bonding or trust fund arrangements. We are continuing to make enquiries to determine whether this protection was in place for them.”

Customers that have lost money should register their details with the Trustees in Bankruptcy by contacting:

Chris Medway
PKF FRANCIS CLARK,
Vantage Point,
Woodwater Park,
Pynes Hill,
Exeter
EX2 5FD

Telephone 01392 667000

Email: chris.medway@pkf-francisclark.co.uk

For further information about consumer legal rights, please contact Citizens Advice Consumer Service on 03454 040506.

Posted 2 November 2017

Categories: Councils, Politics

Residents offered help to maintain winter wellbeing

NHS Cornwalll News - Fri, 03/11/2017 - 00:00
With the nights drawing in and temperatures dropping, residents are being offered help to keep their warm and well this winter.
Categories: Health
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