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144-inch-diameter cylinder, powering eight beams, used to drain Haarlemmermeer in the Netherlands Cruquius station

Harvey & Co. of Hayle was responsible for producing the world's largest ever beam engine. With a 144-inch- diameter cylinder, powering eight beams, it was used to drain the Haarlemmermeer in the Netherlands and has been preserved at the Museum De Cruquius (above). The three men shown stood with a miscast of the gigantic cylinder are Francis Harvey, Jebus Bickle (an important figure at Harvey's who came from a large family of engineers) and the foreman Billy Gilbert. #cruquius #museumdecruquius #beamengine #harveysofhayle #hayleheritage #foundry

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History of pumping station Cruquius

Steam Drainage Pumping Station Cruquius 1849-1932


The pump house at Cruquius is a Netherlands 'Rijksmonument' for the historical engine. It has also been declared an Anchor Point of ERIH, The European Route of Industrial Heritage. [1] It is thought to be the largest steam engine – and certainly the largest beam engine – ever built. The engine was built by Harvey & Co, of Hayle, Cornwall. The diameter of the piston is 144 inches (3.7 m).[2]

 

Francis Harvey, Jebus Bickle (an important figure at Harvey's who came from a large family of engineers) and the foreman Billy Gilbert
Back of Cruquiusmuseum, showing the beams of the pumping engine and the 9 meter drop in water level from the Spaarne river