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Updated: 2 hours 10 min ago

Highways on the agenda for Cornwall Gateway Community Network Panel

Fri, 18/05/2018 - 12:06

Residents of the Cornwall Gateway Community Network area can find out more about highways matters at the Cornwall Gateway Community Network Panel annual general meeting at 6.30pm on Tuesday 29 May at Millbrook Village Hall, The Parade, Millbrook.

The agenda and more information about the panel are available on our Cornwall Gateway Community Network page. 

The meeting will include an update on the A38, and a representative from CORMAC will give an update on local highways maintenance.

There will also be an opportunity to hear about the new Community Network Highways Scheme, which gives community network panels a greater influence over local and major transport schemes.  Community network panels are now able to review and prioritise local schemes and have a budget of £50,000 for highways improvements in their area.

As this is the annual general meeting, the panel will also elect a chair for the next 12 months and consider its priorities for the coming year.

Derek Holley, Chair of Cornwall Gateway Community Network Panel said: “I would encourage everyone to come along to the Cornwall Gateway Community Network Panel meeting to learn more about the local issues in south-east Cornwall.  Highways play an important role in connecting our businesses and communities and much of this meeting will be devoted to highways matters.  You’ll also have a chance to meet your Cornwall, town and parish councillors and to hear their local updates and an update on local policing.”

Cornwall Gateway Network Panel meets quarterly.  Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues. 

Cornwall Gateway Community Network Panel includes all eight Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the 11 parishes in the community network: Antony, Botus Fleming, Landrake with St Erney, Landulph, Maker-with-Rame, Millbrook, Saltash, Sheviock, St Germans, St John and Torpoint.

The meeting is open to the public and everyone is welcome to come along.

Story posted 18 May 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

Hot topics at next week’s full Council – 22 May

Thu, 17/05/2018 - 13:21

Hot rocks, sprinklers and traffic routes are on the agenda for the next full Council meeting.

Matters up for discussion include ‘hot rocks’, providing a commercial rate loan to bring forward work on improved traffic flows around Nansledan and Newquay and installation of sprinklers in all Council new builds.

The meeting will be held at 10.30am on Tuesday 22 May 2018.

The agenda includes a proposal to provide a £1.4m grant to Eden-EGS Energy to help fund a new ‘hot rocks’ project near St Austell, which could unlock the potential for more deep geothermal power in Cornwall.

The project, proposed in Bodelva near St Austell, involves drilling a well to gain access to the hot rocks below with the aim of creating enough heat and electricity to potentially power the Eden Project and surrounding homes.

If supported by full Council, the £1.4m grant would be considered match funding, subject to Eden-EGS Energy achieving funding from other sources including the European Development Fund.

Cabinet portfolio holder for Planning and Economy, Bob Egerton, said: “Cornwall is rich in natural resources and our Council priorities aim to become a world leader in renewable energy, creating more and better paid jobs for people in Cornwall.

“This Council has secured money from national Government which we are using to lever in a total of £35 million funding from private businesses, Europe and research institutions for geothermal energy. This mean Cornwall is the first in the UK to explore the potential to power our economy from deep geothermal energy, the hot rocks and springs lying deep under Cornwall.

“Exploratory work is already underway at United Downs, with the Bodelva site providing further opportunities, if supported. This has huge potential not just for Cornwall but for the national economy. Unlike other renewable sources where energy is dependent on the wind or the sun, deep geothermal offers a stable consistent and secure source of energy.

“This also builds on our devolution deal with Government – and our latest proposition, New Frontiers, which seeks co-investment from Government to piggy-back on our deep geothermal projects, and assess the potential to extract lithium resource that will be in high demand across the globe to power the electric vehicles of the future.”

Councillors will also consider a proposal to install sprinklers in all domestic new builds for sale or let by the Council at a cost of £1.8m. In future, this could also be extended to all homes commissioned by or purchased by the Council.

“This proposal to install sprinklers in all Council new builds could potentially save lives and reduce property damage, as well as reduce insurance costs and callouts by the Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service,” Cabinet portfolio holder for Homes Andrew Mitchell said.

Along with hot rocks and sprinklers, loan funding of £7.1m from the Council’s capital reserves to the Duchy of Cornwall is being considered to bring forward construction of new roads which will deliver up to 3,880 homes and 58,000 sqm of employment space at Nansledan.

If approved, this loan will enable the Duchy of Cornwall to deliver phase 2a of the scheme earlier than planned. The Duchy has already funded and built the eastern arm and Rialton Link phases of the NSR contributing over £15m to the wider scheme. 

The loan would be provided at commercial rates with the Duchy of Cornwall paying back to the Council both the Capital and the interest on the loan.

Cabinet has already agreed funding of £8.7m to help pay for the high infrastructure costs associated with the rail and stream bridges in phase three.  This will support Newquay’s wider transport strategy by providing a more efficient transport network leading to better journey times for drivers and reducing congestion for local people through the villages of Trencreek and Quintrell Downs. The Council’s £8.7m investment would support the direct delivery of the NSR. It is not a grant to Nansledan’s developers or landowners.

“Without Council intervention the full Newquay Strategic Route is not likely to be delivered in the next ten years. This proposal provides a way forward to make the lives of local residents better by improving the road network more quickly, as well as bringing forward more homes, jobs and growth,” Cabinet portfolio holder for Planning and Economy, Bob Egerton, said.

Changes to membership of committees will also be considered, along with the tabling of various committee annual reports.

Members of the public are able to attend full Council meetings in person at New County Hall, or can watch the meeting via a live webcast.

Members of the public can also submit questions no later than midday two clear working days before the meeting. 

Story posted 17 May 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

Flying high as Cornwall gains the most blue flags again

Thu, 17/05/2018 - 11:17

Perranporth Beach Web

Beach champions across Cornwall are celebrating brilliant news today (17 May 2018) as 13 prepare to hoist either, or both, a world-renowned Blue Flag or Seaside Award motif into the sky above their area.  For the fourth year running, Rock-based Sharp’s Brewery has helped ensure that Cornish beaches are the best in the world, continually stepping up to ensure the county has more iconic Blue Flags and Seaside Awards, flying over the coastline, than any other part of the UK.

Sharp’s sponsorship provides the funding for Cornwall Council to make the applications and work with the communities who deliver environmental initiatives, all of which make this fantastic achievement possible.

And in Newquay there is extra reason to celebrate as Great Western Beach has been awarded the world-renowned Blue Flag in a first for the popular destination.  The beach champions here have also created the country’s only beach system that allows them to welcome dogs to a certain area of the beach, whilst ensuring the new Blue Flag area is dog free to comply with the required global standards.

Surrounded by rugged wild beauty at its home in North Cornwall, multi award-winning Sharp’s Brewery is continually giving back to the coast that inspires its creativity providing vital funding for the 2018 Blue Flag and Seaside Award applications, in Cornwall and beyond. Over £32,000 towards the costs of these applications, and other vital Blue Flag related projects has been provided over four years as well as other related programmes such as BeachCare’s Beach Battalion squad.

The iconic Blue Flags, an international quality mark for beaches, reassure visitors and locals alike that Cornwall’s key areas are clean, safe and recommended, boosting tourism, business and helping inspire return visits. Blue Flags and Seaside Awards are only awarded to coastal destinations that boast the highest qualities of water, facilities, safety, keep clean programmes, environmental education and management.

Keep Britain Tidy, the organisation responsible for the awards in the UK, today (17 May 2018) announced that 13 beaches in Cornwall have been awarded either one, or both of the status marks. These include 13 Seaside Awards and seven Blue Flags, making Cornwall a great destination for beach goers and ocean adventurers to visit all year round. Some beaches have received both Blue Flag and Seaside awards to achieve this number.

Thanks to all the hard work of the local beach champions, Cornwall Council and the funding from Sharp’s Brewery, the iconic Blue Flags, and Seaside Award flags, will fly over Gyllyngvase in Falmouth, Porthmeor in St Ives, Polzeath, Porthtowan, Widemouth Bay, Trevone Bay and now Great Western in Newquay.

Porth in Newquay, Summerleaze and Crooklets in Bude, Perranporth, Porthminster in St Ives, Sennen Cove and the Blue Flag winners have been awarded Seaside Awards again this year. 

Cornwall Council Cabinet member for environment and public protection, Sue James, welcomed the Blue Flag and Seaside Awards.

 “Our success in being awarded so many Blue Flag and Seaside Awards confirm what we who live here already know – that Cornish beaches are among the best in the world. I want to thank all those people in communities across Cornwall, who have given their time and dedication to looking after our beautiful beaches. They should all be rightly proud of these awards.  Local bathing champions and beach “guardians” who raise awareness about marine litter and those who organise beach cleans all play a really valuable role in helping us to protect and maintain Cornwall’s reputation as a great place to live and a wonderful place to visit.  I also want to thank Sharps Brewery who once again played a key role in sponsoring the Blue Flag and Seaside Awards applications.”

Keep Britain Tidy’s Chief Executive Allison Ogden-Newton said: “It is fantastic news for Cornwall’s holiday-makers, overseas visitors, residents and businesses that we have been able to award an amazing 20 flags to the county’s beaches this year. “The support from Sharp’s Brewery is invaluable in supporting both Cornwall’s beaches and volunteers, and the Blue Flag more widely – which improves the quality of England’s coastline and promotes our best beaches. “The success of Cornwall’s beaches in reaching the very high standards of both awards are a real testament to all those who have worked so hard to protect and improve our beaches – from beach managers and volunteers to local people and businesses.”

James Nicholls, Senior Brand Manager at Sharp’s Brewery said: "With Sharp’s Brewery being based in Rock, North Cornwall, the coastline and our beaches are deeply important to us. We are delighted to have supported our hard working beach champions and local volunteers, as well as Cornwall Council, and BeachCare (part of Keep Britain Tidy) over the last four years with our support now totalling in excess of £32,000.”

James continued: “The team at Sharp’s fully appreciate the hard work and dedication that goes into gaining, and keeping, so many iconic Cornish Blue Flag and Seaside Awards. Thanks and congratulations to all of these thirteen beaches and to all involved behind the scenes, from us all at Sharp’s Brewery.”

Sharp’s Brewery has also been supporting a brand new initiative in collaboration with Universal Record’s Mercury KX label through sales of its Atlantic Pale Ale. Empowering the ocean to fund its own survival through the creation of ‘Keynvor (meaning ‘ocean’ in Cornish), a recording artist. Keynvor's debut single 'Preservation' is a collaboration with upcoming artist Sebastian Plano. Every stream of Keynvor raises money to protect the Atlantic coastline, with royalties going to Cornwall based charity, Surfers Against Sewage.

Published on 17 May

Categories: Councils, Politics

New Chief Executive of LEP and Service Director for Economic Development and Enterprise appointed

Wed, 16/05/2018 - 19:28

Following an extensive external recruitment process, Mr Glenn Caplin has been appointed as the Chief Executive Officer for the Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly LEP and Service Director (Economic Development and Enterprise) for Cornwall Council.

The response to our search for a new CEO and Service Director was extensive and there was a tremendous amount of interest in the role from across the private and public sectors for the role.

Glenn brings a wealth of experience to the role and has a deep understanding of the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly business sector. He was most recently Director of Strategic Innovation Projects at Falmouth University where he led the university’s venture portfolio work.

Prior to that Glenn was Head of Economic Development, Skills and Culture at Cornwall Council where he set the direction of the Council’s Economic Development and Culture Strategy and its implementation.  He has also held a number of business and economic development roles in the Council and the Cornwall Development Company.

Chair of the LEP, Mark Duddridge said: “This role will have a strong focus on engaging and working with businesses across Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly, setting the strategic direction for the economic growth of Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.

“We are ambitious about making Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly competitive and attractive to business and inward investment, and exploiting the enormous opportunities we have around space, devolution, the launch of our financial loan scheme, the future role of LEPs and the transition from EU to UK funding. Glenn is a fantastic appointment to the role and we are delighted he is joining us.”

Cornwall Council Cabinet portfolio holder for Planning and Economy, Bob Egerton, welcomed Glenn’s appointment: “It is fantastic to be appointing local talent and someone who has a deep knowledge of Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly, backed by a  strong track record of results in economic development and growth. Glenn’s knowledge of and his prior work around skills and economic growth in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly will be invaluable in bringing forward the Council’s and the LEP’s very extensive economic skill and innovation programme.”

Glenn Caplin said he was looking forward to commencing in the role. “I am delighted to be appointed to the role. I am passionate about the potential of Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly and am looking forward to the enormous opportunities this role provides to support the growth of Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly business sector,” he said.

“We already have some amazing businesses in sectors ranging from digital to creative to renewable energy and aerospace. These form the basis of the LEPs 10 Opportunities and my ambition will be to develop and support these even further. I am also looking forward to working with sectors such as tourism and agri-food which also play a big part in the regional economy”.

Glenn will start in the role in July. 

Story posted 10 May 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

Cornwall Council hands over Coronation Park to be managed by local community

Tue, 15/05/2018 - 16:00

Exciting plans to preserve and improve Coronation Park, one of Cornwall’s most historic public parks, have been finalised between Cornwall Council and community group South Kerrier Alliance (SKA).Judah Cross Helston Backslide air

In a ground-breaking agreement, SKA will take on a 99-year lease of the park from Cornwall Council with the Council contributing £109,000 towards capital works improvements.

SKA will also be supported by funding from the Helston Downsland Charity and grant monies of £81,447 from West Cornwall Local Action Group through the LEADER programme. With additional money pledged directly by SKA, this will create a £300,000 investment fund for the Park.

The £300,000 will be spent on improving the boating lake, paths, play park and general repairs as well as making a significant contribution towards a new skate park. Additional funds will be needed to fully replace the Park’s skate equipment but the SKA team is confident that with help from the community a new skate park could be up and running before the end of 2018.

The handover is part of Cornwall Council’s commitment to localism and devolution. Devolving property and services currently held by Cornwall Council gives our local communities the opportunity to shape their areas, make the improvements that sometimes only local knowledge can provide and respond to the demand for local facilities, led by the communities they serve.

David Turnbull, Director of SKA said: “As a not-for-profit community group, the capital promised by Cornwall Council has provided essential match funding, allowing us to apply for additional grants.

We’ve also had wonderful assistance from the Helston Downsland Charity who have supported the project throughout its planning stages and committed £52,000 of funding.”

Councillor for Porthleven and Helston West, Andrew Wallis said: "Coronation Park is not only important to the people of Helston, but also the wider community who have long enjoyed it. It’s a beautiful space recognised as a real haven for families. The Park is the perfect place to relax, walk, row a boat, skateboard or simply eat ice-cream.“

Councillor Edwina Hannaford, Portfolio Holder for Neighbourhoods said: “We’re delighted that this community group has finally secured the powers and investment to run the park. This news comes following a lengthy period of detailed talks and preparations between the Council and South Kerrier Alliance. The project is also a strong example of local devolution in practise – which means it’ll be run by the local community for the local community.”

SKA plan to manage the Park as a non-profit community project with income from the car park, café and cycle hire leases covering the day to day overheads.

“Our plan is to employ a Park Keeper and Apprentice based in the Park, working as part of our team in The Old Cattle Market to look after this beautiful place” said Sarah Vine, Business Manager for SKA. “However, we wouldn’t have been confident to take on such a project without the guarantee of capital funding to address the current issues”.

Speaking on behalf of Helston Downsland Charity, Tim Grattan-Kane said: “This project shows what can be achieved when Cornwall Council, the Downsland Charity and Community Groups work together. It’s a real boost for Helston and will ensure this much-loved amenity is maintained for future generations.”

Further details will be posted on the Coronation Park Helston Facebook page.

 Posted on 15 May

Categories: Councils, Politics

Truro and Roseland Community Network Panel meeting to discuss litter, street sweeping and fly tipping

Tue, 15/05/2018 - 14:59

Residents of the Truro and Roseland Community Network area are being invited to attend the May meeting of the Truro and Roseland Community Network Panel. Items on the agenda include managing litter, street sweeping and fly tipping and the new Community Network Highways Scheme.

All are invited to attend the Network Panel meeting which takes place on Tuesday 15 May 2018 between 7pm and 9pm at Trelawny Room, County Hall, Truro, TR1 3AY.

Cornwall Council Officers who deal with waste management, environmental protection and the Council’s waste contractor Biffa will be coming along to explain the existing local arrangements for litter, street sweeping and fly tipping. They will give details about how communities can help with managing waste as well as answering questions.

Mark O’Brien, the area’s Community Link Officer, will introduce the new Community Network Highways Scheme that will give community network panels a greater influence over local and major transport schemes. Community network panels will be able to review and prioritise local schemes and will have a budget of £50,000 for highways improvements in their area.

As this is also the Annual General Meeting the Panel will be asked to elect a Chair for the next 12 months and review and agree the terms of reference for the Panel.

At the meeting there will be an opportunity for panel members to raise and discuss any urgent issues or suggest future agenda items. Local residents will also have the chance to ask any questions they may have.

Chris Wells, Chairman of the Truro and Roseland Community Network Panel and a Truro City Councillor, said: “Everyone is invited to attend the Truro and Roseland Community Network Panel meeting. The meeting in May is a chance to hear how community network panels will have more influence on improving public roads through the new Community Network Highways Scheme. Come along and find out more.” 

The Truro and Roseland Panel meets bi-monthly to discuss matters that affect the local area. They progress these by working in partnership with Cornwall Council and its partners; including town & parish councils, the voluntary and community sector, and the police and health services.

Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues.

The Truro and Roseland Community Network Panel includes all ten Cornwall Councillors for the area, representatives of Truro City Council and the 18 Parish Councils in the community network: Chacewater, Cuby, Feock, Gerrans, Grampound with Creed, Kea, Kenwyn, Ladock, Philleigh, Probus, Ruan Lanihorne, St Clement, St Erme, St Just-in-Roseland, St Michael Caerhays, St Michael Penkevil, Tregony and Veryan.

People can keep up to date with what’s happening in this area by joining the Truro and Roseland Community Network Area page: www.facebook.com/TruroRoselandCNA .

More information about the Community Network Panels and dates for future meetings can be found on the Cornwall Council Community Networks webpage. 

Posted 3 May 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

New Frontiers’ plan sets the tone for post-Brexit Cornwall

Tue, 15/05/2018 - 14:59

Greater local control in a post-Brexit Britain should gain increasing importance according to a new devolution plan for Cornwall.

As the UK prepares to leave the European Union, the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Leadership Board has created the New Frontiers plan to support a local economy that works for everyone by building global industries, growing skills and wages and protecting our heritage and environment.

New Frontiers has the potential to increase the region’s contribution into the UK economy by £2bn and to support the delivery of at least 20,000 additional jobs by 2030.

If supported by central government, this ambitious plan will make Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly the world’s first ‘net extractor’ of marine plastics, making sure less plastic enters the sea and that more is extracted. It will also boost our renewable energy, creative and digital technologies, space technology and lithium mining industries. Lithium is the raw material used in, amongst other things Tesla car batteries

Leader of Cornwall Council and Chair of the Leadership Board for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly, Adam Paynter, said: “We believe the New Frontiers plan could transform not just our regional economy but also the future prosperity of the country as a whole, issues that we know are important to people locally because you’ve told us.

“The Leadership Board of Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly is united in our ambition to persuade government of the importance of matching our ambitious plans with the resources and powers necessary to make them a reality. The plan also outlines how we can close the gap between our economy and the UK average.”

As the first and only non-metropolitan area with an existing devolution deal, Cornwall has been a trailblazer for how devolved powers and funding can unleash a rural region’s potential.

Since 2015 Cornwall has used devolved powers to deliver real benefits for the economy and the people of Cornwall including:

  • levering £17m private investment into our bus network, allowing an extra 700,000 journeys to travel by bus with the Cornish equivalent of London’s Oyster card
  • levering £7.5m private investment over three years into our Warm and Well programme, where we are making the homes of 1,300 vulnerable households in Cornwall cheaper to heat every year
  • investing in new energy technologies such as deep geothermal that could provide electricity for thousands of homes if successful

Councillor Paynter added: “Some people might argue that this second, more ambitious deal is a distraction when the country is at a major crossroads negotiating its future relationship with Europe. However, we believe is precisely the time to discuss opportunities - the moment when this country is exploring new trading opportunities and considering how new legislation will be developed.”

You can find out more about the New Frontiers plan being submitted to government ministers this week on the Cornwall Council website.

Devolution #StandUpForCornwall.

Posted 2 May

Categories: Councils, Politics

Highways and Community Chest celebrations on the agenda at the Newquay and St Columb Community Network Panel meeting

Tue, 15/05/2018 - 14:59

Residents of the Newquay and St Columb Community Network area are being invited to attend the May meeting of the Newquay and St Columb Community Network Panel. Agenda items include the new Community Network Highways Scheme and celebrating with local organisations that have received a Cornwall Councillor Community Chest grants over the last year.

The Network Panel meeting will take place on Thursday 24 May at 7pm at St Columb Major Town Hall, Market Place, St Columb Major, TR9 6AN.

Esther Richmond, the area’s Community Link Officer, will introduce the new Community Network Highways Scheme that will give community network panels a greater influence over local and major transport schemes. Esther will explain how community network panels will be able to review and prioritise local schemes and will have a budget of £50,000 for highways improvements in their area.

Some of the local voluntary and community groups who have benefited from Community Chest grants from their local councillor will come together to celebrate their award and give a short presentation to promote their work. Groups include Newquay Friends of St Petrocs, Our Town St Columb Major, Pentire Esplanade Project, Newquay Orchard, Porth Residents Association, Treloggan Residents Association and Oll An Gwella Choir.

Community Chest grants can be used for various activities such as helping vulnerable people and supporting community facilities and local environment projects. In the Newquay and St Columb network area grants have funded local initiatives, including supporting St Columb Major’s Arts and Heritage Festival and promoting wellbeing by offering Tai Chi to residents at St Petrocs.

As this is the Annual General Meeting the Panel will be asked to elect a Chair and Vice Chair for the Community Network Panel for the next 12 months.

St Mawgan and Colan Cllr John Fitter and Chairman of the Newquay and St Columb Community Network Panel said: “Everyone is invited to attend the Newquay and St Columb Community Network Panel. The Community Chest celebrations and the new highways scheme are both good examples of how proposals to strengthening community networks are being put into practise. Come along, find out more and meet your parish, town and Cornwall councillor.”

The Newquay and St Columb Network Panel meets bi-monthly to discuss matters that affect the local area. At future meetings they will be discussing the other priorities they have for the network area; highways schemes and health.

They progress these by working in partnership with Cornwall Council and its partners; including town and parish councils, the voluntary and community sector, and the police and health services.

Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues.

The Newquay and St Columb Community Network Panel includes all seven Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the five Towns or Parish parishes in the community network: Colan Parish Council, Mawgan-in-Pydar Parish Council, Newquay Town Council, St Columb Major Town Council and St Wenn Parish Council.

More information about the Community Network Panels and dates for future meetings can be found on the Cornwall Council Community Networks webpage. 

For details about Cornwall Councillor Community Chest grants visit: www.cornwall.gov.uk/communitychest

Story posted 10 May 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

New ‘bulk buy’ parking session option gives car park users option to park at cheaper rate

Tue, 15/05/2018 - 14:59

Car park users who bulk buy tickets will pay a maximum of only a few pounds for all day parking following the introduction of a new Cornwall Council offer to reduce parking rates for residents.

Drivers can now bulk buy ‘all day’ parking sessions through the JustPark App (subject to a minimum purchase of £47).

Visit the JustPark website to purchase bulk buy parking sessions

The new offer will bring down the cost of all day parking in all long stay Cornwall Council pay and display car parks. The daily rate is based on the cost of annual season tickets for either a specific car park or number of car parks within an area. For example in Truro, bulk buying sessions reduces the cost of all day parking from £8 to £2.19, while in Penzance, the cost is less than £1.

While season tickets for a set time period (one month, three months, six months and yearly) are available for drivers to buy on the Council's website, sessions bought in bulk through JustPark can be used at any point during a two year period.

Find out more about using JustPark and how to download the App

Cornwall Council cabinet member for Transport Geoff Brown said the option provided car park users flexibility in the way they pay to park.

"With this option, you 'load' money on to your parking account through the JustPark App and pay for the cheaper all day parking sessions when you use them. It’s like pre-paid for your phone but providing a discount too," he said. "This gives residents more choice. Even if you only use a car park once a week, this soon pays for itself and is a big improvement on what we have offered before. It’s particularly aimed at residents so they can park at a reduced rate even if they only use the car park once a week."

As part of the changes to tariffs which came into effect on 1 April, we have also introduced free parking in the majority of Council car parks in the evenings. People who responded to last year's town parking review highlighted concerns about the lack of on-street parking at night and businesses and Cornwall councillors have also told us that abolishing evening parking charges will help support local economies.

Categories: Councils, Politics

200 people join online event seeking solutions to loneliness in Cornwall

Tue, 15/05/2018 - 14:59

Two hundred people joined an online conversation hosted by Cornwall Council last week to help find ways communities can best tackle loneliness and social isolation.

During the conversation people talked about what loneliness means to them and shared ideas on how to reduce loneliness in the future. Participants described the live crowdsourcing event as ‘thought provoking’, ‘valuable’, and ‘interesting’.

Many defined loneliness as a feeling of not belonging, ‘not having anyone to talk to’, or ‘not being part of things.’ When asked what people need from others when they are lonely, many participants prioritised ‘friendship, emotional support, and social interaction’.

Most people agreed that coffee mornings and libraries are a good way of reducing loneliness, other ideas included ‘sit down yoga, childhood song sessions and pet therapy’.

The feedback will help Cornwall Council better understand the problems communities face in trying to address loneliness and isolation.

Cornwall Council’s Head of Provider Services David Coleman said: “In 2017 we asked people what they needed to stay healthy and independent. They told us loneliness and isolation were a problem.

More than two million people in England over the age of 75 live alone, and more than a million older people say they go for over a month without speaking to a friend, neighbour or family member.” *

“People can become socially isolated for a variety of reasons, such as getting older or weaker, because they’ve left work, their spouse has died or through disability or illness. This can lead to depression and a serious decline in physical health and wellbeing, so we’re keen to look at ways to keep people well, healthy and out of hospital by starting conversations like this,” he said.

Cornwall Council Cabinet member for adults, Rob Rotchell added: “Judging by the high engagement and breadth of insights participants shared during this event, loneliness is an issue a great many people care about and want to find solutions to.”

“Loneliness is a challenging issue for Cornwall as we have an aging population and our towns and villages are geographically spread out. We hope the findings from this event and future planned focus groups will raise awareness of this important issue, and help us to join forces with communities across Cornwall to find workable, innovative solutions to loneliness that support people in their local area.”

Information from the event will now be analysed and later made available on the council’s website.

9 May 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

St Austell and Mevagissey Community Network Panel meeting to discuss waste and recycling, highways and speedwatch

Tue, 15/05/2018 - 14:59

Residents of the St Austell and Mevagissey Community Network area are being invited to attend the May meeting of the St Austell and Mevagissey Community Network Panel.

The main items on the agenda are waste and recycling, the new Community Network Highways Scheme and Speed Watch.

All are invited to attend the Network Panel meeting which takes place on Thursday 10 May 2018 between 6pm and 8pm in the Council Chamber at the St Austell Information Service (also known as the One Stop Shop), 39 Penwinnick Road, PL25 5DR.

The three main agenda items will be covered in a workshop, trialling a different meeting style. Attendees will work in smaller groups where there will be an informal discussion about one topic at a time.

Rachael Tatlow, Highway and Environment Manager, from Cormac will be discussing highways improvement proposals put forward by Network members. This is part of a new initiative, the Community Network Highways Scheme. Community network panels will prioritise local schemes and will have a budget of £50,000 for highways improvements in their area.

Helen Nicholson, Community Link Officer for the area, will present details about Community Speed Watch schemes, which aim to engage and educate speeding drivers. This involves teams of trained volunteers monitoring traffic from the roadside in speeding hot spots. Speeding vehicles are recorded and warning letters are sent to the vehicle owner together with educational information. Volunteers are being sought for a team who will word across the Community Network Area.

Verity Palk, Waste and Environmental Contracts Team Leader and Geoff Passmore, Waste and Environment Contracts Officer will present facts on the waste and recycling services in the local area. This will include how much waste is collected and how often, and how good residents are at recycling in the Community Network Area. Initiatives to help improve recycling will be discussed.

At the start of the meeting there will be an opportunity for local residents to ask any questions they may have.

Town and Parish Councillors will also be able to give feedback on local matters.

Cornwall Councillor Sandra Heyward, Chair of the St Austell and Mevagissey Community Network Panel, said: “Come along and join us for the May meeting of the St Austell and Mevagissey Community Network Panel. We hope this different format will give those attending a better opportunity to discuss some practical solutions to issues of interest across the area. The meeting is also a chance to meet your parish, town and Cornwall councillor.”

The St Austell and Mevagissey meets quarterly to discuss matters that affect the local community. They progress these by working in partnership with Cornwall Council and its partners; including town & parish councils, the voluntary and community sector, and the police and health services.

Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues.

The panel comprises of all seven Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the eight Town or Parish parishes in the community network: Carlyon, Mevagissey, Pentewan, St Austell Bay, St Austell Town, St Ewe, St Goran, St Mewan.

More information about the Community Network Panels and dates for future meetings can be found on the Cornwall Council Community Networks webpage.

Posted 4 May

Categories: Councils, Politics

Cabinet decide to invest in renewable energy, housing and a key road project

Tue, 15/05/2018 - 14:59

At yesterday's (02 May 2018) meeting, Cornwall Council’s Cabinet decided to invest in bold initiatives to kick start housing, renewable energy and road infrastructure projects for the economic benefit of residents.

The Cabinet unanimously approved a £1.4m grant to the Eden Project to help fund a new “hot rocks” project near St Austell, which could unlock the potential for more deep geothermal power in Cornwall.

The project, proposed in Bodelva near St Austell, involves drilling a well to gain access to the hot rocks below with the aim of creating enough heat and electricity to potentially power the Eden Project and surrounding homes. 

Cabinet members agreed to provide the £1.4m grant as match funding, subject to the Eden Project achieving £15.3m from other sources including funding from the European Development Fund.

Cabinet member for planning and economy, Bob Egerton said: “We know that granite in some areas of Cornwall has the highest heat flow in the UK – and the natural geothermal springs are rich in lithium deposits.

“If we can find a way to exploit geothermal power successfully, these hot rocks have the potential to provide Cornwall with a rich source of strategic minerals and renewable energy, as well as significant benefits to the local economy from jobs, research and investment.

“This exploration for geothermal power at the Eden Project is a first step towards testing the technology we need to help us to exploit geothermal power more widely across Cornwall.”

The Cabinet also agreed in principle to the Council taking a significant strategic leadership and delivery role in developments at Threemilestone where planning permissions is already in place for 2,700 dwellings but where no building has started on any of the sites.

The decision paves the way for further proposals to be put forward to the Council to purchase specific parcels of land and to bring forward developments on those sites. The Council will also aim to enter into contractual relationships with other developers who own land there so that the Council can masterplan the whole area.

Cllr Bob Egerton, Cornwall Council cabinet member for planning and economy said: “If the Council does not intervene, it is likely that some of those sites will start to be built by individual developers and we will end up with an uncoordinated series of estates without the appropriate infrastructure, or, instead, duplication of infrastructure, to the detriment of the whole community.

By acting as master planner, the Council can ensure that developments are coordinated for the benefit of all. For example, schools will be brought forward in a timely manner. We would also aim to avoid large scale, out of town retail developments that would impact adversely on Truro city centre. When completed, the development will be the size of a new town. It will be a town with its own local facilities but complementary to Truro itself. It will add to, rather than detract from, Truro.”

The developments led by Cornwall Council will be made up of a mixture of housing types, including a significant proportion of affordable housing, but also housing owned by the Council and rented at market rents.

Members also agreed to support the recommendation to joint fund phases two and three of the Newquay Strategic Route (NSR) with £8.7m from the Council’s Economic Development Fund Capital Reserves.

This will enable the access road for the major growth area to be delivered early by autumn 2020, unlocking development and creating new homes and jobs for residents.

More than £15m of funding has been already identified for phases two and three of the NSR. The additional £8.7m agreed today will help pay for the high infrastructure costs associated with the rail and stream bridges in phase three.

Cornwall Council planning and economy cabinet member Bob Egerton said: “Building the NSR will support the delivery of the Nansledan development in Newquay, creating up to 3,880 homes and 58,000 sqm of employment space to 2030 and beyond. This includes the Chapel Gover site which has planning conditions, restricting the development of 800 new homes, until the access road is delivered.

The route also supports Newquay’s wider transport strategy by providing a more efficient transport network leading to better journey times for drivers and reducing congestion for local people through the villages of Trencreek and Quintrell Downs. The Council’s £8.7m investment would support the direct delivery of the NSR. It is not a grant to Nansledan’s developers or landowners.”

Cabinet also recommended that full Council consider a capital loan of £7.1m to the Duchy of Cornwall to enable the Duchy to deliver phase 2a of the scheme earlier than planned. The Duchy has already funded and built the eastern arm and Rialton Link phases of the NSR contributing over £15m to the wider scheme. The Duchy of Cornwall will pay back to the Council both the Capital and the interest on the loan.

The Cabinet also noted the findings and recommendations of an independent report on CORMAC whose overall findings were generally positive and which showed that core business areas of CORMAC are performing adequately and delivering value for money. They agreed that an action plan be created to implement the recommendations of the report.

Cabinet also supported a recommendation to change the procurement of Public Health Nursing (PHN), which covers health visiting and school nursing services, when the current contract with Cornwall Partnership Foundation Trust (CPFT) finishes in March next year.

The PHN service offers universal health promotion, screening, guidance, information and development review for every child and to every mother.

As the commissioning organisation, the Council completed an options appraisal which considered how the PHN service could deliver the best outcomes for children and young people.

Further work will now be undertaken for the PHN service to be integrated into a single organisation with the Council children’s services. There will be no change to current services under the current contract.

The recommended change has been the subject of broad engagement with children and young people, elected Members and strategic partners, including the Children’s Overview and Scrutiny Committee, the members of the Health and Adult Social Care Scrutiny Committee and the members of the Health and Wellbeing Board.

Posted 3 May

Categories: Councils, Politics

Council calls for more foster carers

Tue, 15/05/2018 - 14:59

This Foster Care Fortnight (14 – 27 May), Cornwall Council is appealing for people to come forward as potential foster carers to look after vulnerable children and young people who are unable to live with their families.

Looking after vulnerable children is everyone’s business, and with 460 children in Cornwall unable to live at home, there is an urgent need for many more foster carers who are able to offer them guidance, stability and love. There is also a need for people who can care for a child or young person permanently until they reach independence.

Children and young people may be unable to live with their families for a number of reasons such as their parents being ill, family relationships problems or because they have suffered from abuse or neglect.

Michelle and Dan are foster carers in Cornwall and have cared for nearly 20 children and young people over the years. They said:  “Fostering for us means that we are making a difference in children’s lives. Watching sad, anxious faces slowly changing into happy and confident ones, and rebuilding the trust that they have lost. It can be challenging sometimes and even heart breaking but the results are so rewarding. This is the best thing we have ever done in our lives. We love it with all our hearts”

Paul, a young person who has been in foster care, said: "Being in foster care has changed my life for the better. I came from a negative place but being in care has given me the chance to achieve."

Cornwall Council Cabinet member for Children and Wellbeing Sally Hawken said: "Foster carers do an amazing job and can be so important in raising the self-confidence and aspirations of the children and young people they look after. What’s important is that they have time, energy and patience to give a child or young person."

"Many people have misconceptions about fostering, and worry that they may not be eligible. Our foster carers are of all ages and from all walks of life and all have different life experiences. This ranges from single people, young or old, married and same sex couples and caring professionals, to empty nesters and people from different cultures and religious backgrounds. Fostering can a fantastic and rewarding experience, and many of our children and young people live with the same foster family throughout their childhood, providing them with great security and emotional permanence.

"All of our foster carers get comprehensive training and support and there is a continual development programme that covers a wide range of subjects."

To find out more about becoming a foster carer, call the Fostering Team on 01872 323 638 or visit  www.fosterincornwall.co.uk

Posted on 15 May

Categories: Councils, Politics

Truro Cathedral hosts Cornwall Youth Orchestras

Wed, 02/05/2018 - 17:18

The two orchestras of the Cornwall Music Education Hub: the Cornwall Youth Orchestra and the Cornwall Youth Wind Orchestra, once again held their annual Easter concerts in Truro Cathedral to mark the end of the 2017/18 season.

The Cornwall Youth Orchestra, directed by Tim Boulton, held two concerts.  The first, on Thursday 12 April, was a free informal concert to which groups from day centres and care homes were invited. This was followed by a formal concert on the Friday evening. This year’s programme, ‘From darkness to light’, featured an exciting selection of pieces from Sibelius, Debussy, Shostakovich and Dvořák and included a stunning solo by 13 year old local violinist, Biletugs Lut, who has already achieved a number of international accolades.

The Cornwall Youth Wind Orchestra held their spring concert on Saturday 14 April with a programme of rousing music which included pieces by Richard Strauss, Alfred Reed and Phillip Sparke. The music conjured up images of journeys through both the English countryside in Nigel Hess’ Thames Journey and the exotic locations of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World by Alex Poelman. 

The concert marked the end of an era for the orchestra as, after 29 years, Director Janet Elston stepped down from her role and handed over the baton to new Director, Sara Munns. The coaches and players of the orchestra presented Janet with a number of gifts as thanks for her tremendous hard work and support. 

The Cornwall Youth Orchestra and the Cornwall Youth Wind Orchestra are two of the Cornwall Music Education Hub’s county level ensembles which provide inspirational progression opportunities for the young musicians of Cornwall.

Posted 25 April

Categories: Councils, Politics

Enjoy our countryside but keep a look out for ticks

Wed, 02/05/2018 - 12:49

Just like us, ticks enjoy the warm spring and summer weather. With spring heralding the arrival of warmer weather, now’s the time to keep an eye out for ticks on you and your pets.

Ticks can carry Lyme disease, which if left untreated can lead to serious illness. Lyme disease can generally be treated effectively with a short course of antibiotics, but if it’s not treated or there is a delay in treatment, there’s a risk you could develop more serious conditions such as nerve damage, joint pain or more rarely, heart problems.

The risk of infection increases the longer a tick remains attached to the skin; removing ticks promptly will reduce the chances of infection.

Ticks live in dense wooded areas or long grasses and attach themselves to passing animals and humans. So if you’ve been out enjoying our Cornish countryside we suggest you carry out a tick check when you get home.

Knowing how to remove tick properly is really important, to make sure that parts of the tick aren’t left behind in you or your pet’s skin.  If you have been bitten by a tick remove it as soon as possible.

Tick bites may not hurt and you don’t always notice you’ve been bitten, so make sure you thoroughly check yourself, your children and your pets. Young children are more commonly bitten on the head so carefully check around their neck, behind the ears and along the hairline.

If you start to feel unwell with flu like symptoms, develop a red bullseye like rash call your GP or NHS 111 and remember to tell them you have spent time outdoors, or have been bitten by a tick.

James Luxton who lives near Truro was bitten by a tick last year and it developed into Lyme Disease.

“I spend a lot of time outdoors biking, running and surfing so it was probably when I was out and about in the countryside. I also travel with work a lot and had just returned from a trip to rural Sri Lanka so it is possible I picked it up there. 

“I had a red rash about 5cm2 with a little raised spot in the middle of it, which I thought might be an insect bite which had got infected. I went to the doctor and as I'd just got back from Sri Lanka he concluded it was a fungal infection and gave me some anti-inflammatory cream.

“About 10 days later the rash had got larger and was starting to show the tell-tale bulls-eye pattern so I went back to the doctor and got re-assessed. He took a day to confer with colleagues and then concluded it was Lyme Disease. I took antibiotics for 2 weeks and the rash quickly went and the issue seems to have been resolved. 

“When I got back from Sri Lanka I was more tired than normal and had difficulty falling and staying asleep. Luckily the antibiotics cleared the symptoms quite quickly and I haven’t had any lasting effects. I’ll continue to spend time outdoors doing what I love, because the benefits far outweigh the risk, but I’ll definitely be keeping a closer eye out for ticks and bites when I get home.”

We’re also asking people to help us track ticks. If you find a tick, you can order a tick kit to post it back to Public Health England laboratories for analysis so they can start to produce data on where ticks are picked up. You can find out how to order a kit – and more information on the tick page of our website.

Helpful hints and tips to perform a tick check and how to remove them:

  • Look over your clothes and body regularly if you’re outdoors, and brush off any ticks you see.
  • Carry out a thorough tick check when at home by removing your clothing and having a good look and feel for ticks – look out for anything as small as a speck of dirt or a freckle.
  • If you do get bitten, removing the tick quickly and correctly can help to reduce any potential risk of infection.
  • The safest way to remove a tick is to use a pair of fine-tipped tweezers, or a tick removal tool
  • Grasp the tick as close to the skin as possible and pull upwards slowly and firmly, as mouthparts left in the skin can cause a local infection
  • Once removed, apply antiseptic to the bite area, or wash with soap and water and keep an eye on it for several weeks for any changes
  • Don’t be tempted to burn them off with a lighter, as this can leave part of the tick attached to skin and can lead to infection.

Story posted 30 April.

Categories: Councils, Politics

Emergency stopping place for Gypsies and Travellers opens at South Treviddo

Wed, 02/05/2018 - 12:49

Cornwall’s first emergency stopping place for Gypsies and Travellers has opened at South Treviddo near Liskeard.

The emergency stopping place will allow Cornwall Council to guide Gypsy and Traveller families away from unauthorised encampments such as those seen in Liskeard car parks and Looe’s Millpool car park in recent years and onto the purpose built site instead.  Gypsies and Travellers who wish to use the site are being encouraged to pre-book a pitch with site managers Cornwall Housing.

The emergency stopping place has seven temporary pitches for short term accommodation for Gypsies and Travellers who will normally move on within 28 days.  The site provides toilet facilities, waste facilities and a secure space in the short term. The emergency stopping place has been funded by £185,000 from Cornwall Council’s Affordable Housing Capital Programme.

Work is due to begin soon on the second phase of the project, which will see the site become a Gypsy and Traveller transit site, with a further eight pitches and electricity, CCTV, ablution blocks and an amenity area.  Transit sites are usually used by Gypsies and Travellers for stays of three months or less. 

Andrew Mitchell, Cornwall Council Cabinet Member for Homes, said: “Cornwall Council has a legal duty to provide these sites and our Local Plan has identified a need for 60 more transit pitches by 2030.  We aim to provide these across four new transit sites of 10-15 pitches each across the whole of Cornwall.  South Treviddo is the first of these sites and will provide much needed new pitches in time for the summer when demand for pitches in Cornwall increases.”

Edwina Hannaford, Cornwall Council Cabinet Member for Neighbourhoods, said: “With Cornwall’s existing Gypsy and Traveller sites already full to capacity, it’s really important for us to provide more emergency stopping places and transit sites across Cornwall.  Emergency stopping places and transit sites ensure that Gypsies and Travellers have access to basic amenities that our settled communities take for granted.  These amenities make a huge difference to the health and quality of life of Gypsies and Travellers.”

No decisions have been taken so far about possible locations for the other new transit sites in Cornwall.

Story posted 30 April 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

Eden Bar in Newquay has Licence revoked

Wed, 02/05/2018 - 12:48

Cornwall Councils’ Licensing Sub Committee has revoked the premises licence for Eden Bar, 1 Beach Road, Newquay, after considering information from Devon and Cornwall Police and Public Health and Licensing Compliance Officers at Cornwall Council.

The application to review the nightclub’s licence in the interests of community safety was supported by Cornwall Councils’ Licensing Compliance Team, Public Health, Newquay Town Council and local Cornwall Councillor Geoff Brown.

Mrs Sue Edwards presented the case on behalf of Devon and Cornwall police and informed the Licensing Sub Committee, made up of three Cornwall Councillors that 31 breaches of the premises licence had occurred over a period of ten months.

CCTV evidence of an incident which occurred outside Eden Night Club on 4 August 2017 was produced by Mrs Edwards. This involved the nightclubs’ Designated Premises Supervisor who was subsequently convicted of a Public Order Offence and heavily fined, as well as a separate staff member of the club who was convicted of Common Assault.

In supporting the review of Eden Bar’s licence, Jez Bayes, public health and Safer Cornwall alcohol strategy co-ordinator, explained that the nightclub is within Newquay’s Cumulative Impact Zone, a location that has a high level of alcohol related injuries. Mr Bayes said that the evidence suggested that the Eden Bar had not been fulfilling the responsibilities held by all premises in that area, to promote public safety and minimise crime, disorder and public nuisance.

In making their decision the committee noted the behaviour of the staff and number of breaches of the conditions of the premises licence. These included doors being left open allowing loud music to emanate, an upstairs window being left open causing a potential health and safety issue and alcohol being carried in and out of the premises in open containers.

The committee considered other issues including registered door staff not wearing their security industry authority badges, not keeping an up to date incident book and allegations of underage drinking. During the meeting, the representative for the premises license holder offered to replace the Designated Premises Supervisor and door staff.

The Committee stated that having considered the information and the licensing objectives, prevention of crime and disorder, public safety, public nuisance, and protection of children from harm, they had no option but to revoke the licence in the interest of the wider community.

Following the hearing Mr Bob Mears from Cornwall Council’s Licensing Compliance team said: “We work very closely with all of the Responsible Authorities including Devon and Cornwall Police. This review was called for by the police and supported by us, as a last resort as all other avenues to try and resolve this persistent offending had been explored and failed.”

Councillor Edwina Hannaford - Portfolio holder for Neighbourhoods said: “This is a good example of effective partnership working with Devon & Cornwall Police. Thankfully this case does not reflect the majority of businesses in Cornwall who fulfil the conditions of their premises licences so they can offer entertainment for our communities to enjoy.”

The Eden Bar now has 21 days to appeal the decision to a Magistrates Court.

Posted 30 April 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

Students get first hand experience in fire safety activities

Wed, 02/05/2018 - 12:47

Students at Newquay Tretherras School got a taste of fire safety activities this week as they took part in a special training course run by Cornwall Fire and Rescue’s Phoenix team.

The five-day training course aimed at promoting team work and communication skills, and raising confidence and aspirations includes fire safety activities such as hose running, marching, wearing breathing apparatus.

The Phoenix Project is a Cornwall-wide initiative for young people between the ages of 13 -17 which aims to improve community resilience, the economic prospects of young people and deliver high quality training solutions across Cornwall.

Thousands of young people in Cornwall have benefited from the project since it started in 2002. The students will take part in an official passing out parade at Newquay Fire Station on Friday to mark the completion of the course.

Cornwall Council Portfolio Holder for Environment and Public Protection Councillor Sue James said: “This training is an important way to invest in young people across Cornwall and promote safety in our communities. As well as building resilience, the training provides transferable skills to use at school, in further education or in the workplace. Ultimately it helps us build a more resilient Cornwall.”

Phoenix Services Manager Marytn Addinall said: “These pupils from Newquay Tretherras Schoolhave shown great enthusiasm in taking part in training which includes fire and road safety advice and first aid. We are proud to work in partnership with the school to help pupils gain important life skills and support young people to be more resilient for the future.”

Chief Fire Officer Paul Walker said: “It’s great to see yet more young people learn how to become better communicators and leaders and learn a very important fire safety message at the same time. Initiatives such as Phoenix help us to achieve safer communities from the ground up, which is the principal aim of the service.”

More information about Phoenix can be found on the Phoenix Cornwall website.

Posted 25 April 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

Who Dares Serves in Helston

Wed, 02/05/2018 - 12:47

Participants completing the latest ‘Who Dares Serves’ course will attend a passing out parade on Friday 18 May at Helston Community Fire Station.

Who Dares Serves is a week-long, multi-agency course giving people insight into working with Cornwall Fire & Rescue Service, and a host of public services from across the South West. Focussing on a taster into each public service, the course gives an idea of the breadth of skills it takes for each to operate and how individuals can be involved within these services.

Who Dares Serves is a one of a range of innovative work-related options within the ‘Who Dares Works’ project, funded by the National Lottery through the Big Lottery Fund and the European Social Fund and led by award-winning Community Interest Company, Active Plus.

The official passing out parade marks the culmination of the group’s learning over the five days. During the ceremony, held in front of family and friends, the group will showcase techniques demonstrated throughout the week, including hose running and first aid.

Who Dares Serves is led by Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service who have been running the Phoenix Project since 2002 to enhance self-confidence, communication skills and community spirit.

Dr Julian Commons, Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service Phoenix Project Manager, said: “Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service commits itself to developing skills for members of the local community. The fire service is able to use its reputation and position of authority and respect within the community to hone team work, communication and leadership skills. The participants from the Who Dares Serves course have worked extremely hard to succeed throughout this week and we are very proud to be able to work in partnership with the emergency services across the South West.”

Carolyn Webster, Project Manager for Who Dares Works, said: “It is great to see public services coming together to deliver this course. We know from the feedback from previous courses how positive the impact is with comments such as ‘this has been such a massive boost for my personal confidence!’ The course plays a great role in helping motivate and inspire people into taking the next steps towards training and work.”

Cllr James, Cornwall Council Portfolio Holder for Environment and Public Protection, said: “We are very proud to support the Who Dares Serves project which not only connects our services to the local community but also helps to build community resilience and improve the skills and confidence of the participants.”

Who Dares Works is a partnership of 17 organisations working together to support over 850 people across West Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly to get into work, education and training, and is led by Active Plus. Over the next 2-3 years, the project will receive up to £3.3 million of funding from the Big Lottery Building Better Opportunities Programme, funded by the Big Lottery Fund and the European Social Fund as part of the 2014-2020 European Structural and Investment Funds Growth Programme in England.

Anyone wishing to find out more about what’s available within Who Dares Works can call 01872 300236, email whodaresworks@activeplus.org.uk

Story posted 25 April 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

Highways and Community Emergency Plans on the agenda for Falmouth and Penryn Community Network Panel meeting

Wed, 02/05/2018 - 12:46

Residents of the Falmouth and Penryn Community Network Panel area are invited to attend the May meeting of the Falmouth and Penryn Community Network Panel, items on the agenda include highways, Community Emergency Plans, Community Chest Grants and the Cornwall Fire & Rescue Service ‘Adopt a Parish’ Scheme. 

The meeting takes place on Tuesday 8 May 2018, between 7pm and 9pm, at Tremayne Hall, Lemon Hill, Mylor Bridge in Falmouth.

Arthur Roberts, Resilience and Emergency Officer will be attending the Panel to discuss Community Emergency Plans. Community Emergency plans form part of the Cornwall Community Resilience Network, which helps communities to be prepared to respond to an emergency, like flooding, heavy snowfall or a major fire.

Also on the agenda is a update from Sean Taylor, Cornwall Fire, Rescue and Community Safety Service Station Manager, about the ‘Adopt a Parish scheme and Mark James, Cornwall Council Localism Manager, about the Cornwall Councillor Community Chest Grants which have been allocated to local charities and community groups so far this year.

Cornwall Councillor Bastin, Chair of the Falmouth and Penryn Community Network Panel, said: “The Falmouth & Penryn Community Network Panel meeting is a great opportunity for local residents and businesses to ask questions about local issues so please do come along and take part.”

The Falmouth and Penryn Community Network Panel meets every other month to discuss matters that affect the local community and to agree priorities that can be delivered by Cornwall Council and other agencies including the police and health services. Some of the areas that community networks focus on include anti-social behaviour, economic development, the environment, community planning, regeneration, conservation, community safety, transport and highway issues.

The panel comprises all nine Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the nine parishes in the Falmouth and Penryn Community Network - Budock, Constantine, Falmouth, Mabe, Mawnan, Mylor, Penryn, Perranarworthal and St Gluvias.  

More information about the Community Network Panels and dates for future meetings  can be found on the Cornwall Council Community Network webpage. 

Story posted 24 April 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics