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1824 | It is related that very great alarm was occasioned at St. Ives on the first appearance of a steamer on the coast

October 15, 1824. — Arrived a steam vessel, which went for Hayle.*


* It is related that very great alarm was occasioned at St. Ives on
the first appearance of a steamer on the coast. It was thought to
be a vessel on fire, and boats were manned to go out to her
assistance ; but on her coming nearer she was discovered to be a
steam vessel, which went into Hayle.

1824 November 10 | Some houses on the beach were unroofed, windows broken, and cellar-doors forced open by the violence of the w

1824 November 10 -- Wind N.E., a very heavy gale, with a tremendous sea ; damage to shipping trivial, but some houses on the beach were unroofed, windows broken, and cellar-doors forced open by the violence of the waves. The sea broke at intervals into the churchyard, the graves were levelled, and two head-stones washed down.

1826 | The schooner Polmanter began to load alongside St. Ives Quay the first cargo of copper-ore ever shipped from this port

1826

April 12. — The L Ocean ran on shore on the Eastern 
Spits, and filled with water; crew saved. The pilot, 
Richard Grenfell, received an injury. 

April 13. — The L! Ocean discharged 100 tons logwood 
into Hayle barges. Her repairs at St. Ives, previous 
to her loss, cost £1,249 17s. 6d. The wreck has been 
sold for £205. 

 

May 12 --The schooner Polmanter began to load alongside St. 
Ives Quay the first cargo of copper-ore ever shipped 
from this port direct from a mine. This cargo is from 
Wheal Trenwith. 
 
May 27. — Mackerel selling 3d. each ; butter in Pen- 
zance market io^d, and beef 7d. per pound ; barley 16s., 
wheat 27s., potatoes us. per bushel.  

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1822 | The people at Hayle called out the Yeoman Cavalry for trading in copper-ore at 4s. per ton

1822

May 14. — The Captains of the colliers trading to this 
port, Hayle and Portreath, formed a combination not 
to carry copper-ore for less than 5s. per ton, or to sell 
coals from Wales for less than 50s. per way (16s. 8d. 
per ton). 

May 20. — The sailors at Hayle dismantled Captain 
Sargeant's vessel for trading in copper-ore at 4s. per 
ton, on which account the people at Hayle called out 
the Yeoman Cavalry. 

Velling-Varine, Sunday 8 August 1743 | Charles Wesley

According to 

The Wesleys in Cornwall, 1743–1789: A Record of Their Activities Town by Town

By Samuel J.
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1824 | Sluicing and Sluice Gates

In 1769, the Cornish Copper Company made a canal of about half a mile in length from Hayle to Copper-house, to bring small vessels to the copper works; and erected small flood gates near the upper end, to keep the canal clear of sand. The harbour of Hayle before 1788, was seldom accessible to vessels of more than 70 tons burthen through the accumulation of sand on the bar, which crosses its entrance; and from the sudden shifting of the sand banks, vessels were frequently exposed to danger both in entering and in leaving the harbour. In 1788 the company carried a wear across the entrance of Phillack creek, and erected flood gates on the southern side of it. These were opened to admit the coming tide, and at high water were closed.  read more »

1856 | Notice to quit, Angarrack Smelting House, Phillack

Ref No G/97
Title
Notice to quit, Angarrack Smelting House, Phillack
Date
19 Mar 1856
Format
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