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Owners of specially adapted Blue Badge vehicles urged to register with the Council to continue to receive free parking in ‘pay on exit’ car parks

Tue, 12/02/2019 - 15:36

Blue Badge holders who drive a specially adapted vehicle are urged to register their details with the Council so they can continue to park for free in Council car parks where new pay on exit technology is being rolled out.

Blue Badge holders who have a specially adapted vehicle are asked to register their vehicle from the 21 January 2019 by calling 0300 1234 222.   A registration form, including the relevant terms and conditions will be sent to the applicant.  Proof of a recognised vehicle adaption and a copy of the Blue Badge must be supplied as part of the registration process.

Customers who drive a specially adapted vehicle have not needed to register with the Council in the past as our enforcement officers are trained to spot those vehicles.  New technology needed to operate pay on exit car parks means this is no longer possible and, as we want to continue to provide free parking for adapted vehicles, we are asking people to register with us if they will be using them.  Blue Badge holders who drive specially adapted vehicles will still be able to park for free in all our other standard pay and display car parks even if they don’t register.

Blue Badge holders whose disabled vehicle qualifies for free tax and are already registering every year on the Council’s Disabled Exemption Scheme, won’t have to register twice.  The technology for pay on exit uses vehicle registration details and those who have a valid and current Disabled Exemption permit will be able to continue to park for free in both standard and pay on exit car parks without contacting us. 

Twelve car parks in 8 towns are the first to be moved over to pay on exit technology as part of the Council’s Positive Parking Framework.

The introduction of pay on exit technology in around 10% of our car parks will provide great benefits for the community as it will free up enforcement officers time to patrol the wider town centres, reducing traffic congestion from vehicles illegally parked on the highway. 

The Council will continue to operate the remaining 90% of its car parks without the new pay on exit technology and in those 100 + car parks, all Blue Badge holders who currently receive a discretionary additional free hour of parking on top of the time they pay for, will still be able to do so.  While the pay on exit technology provides improved access and allows users to stay longer in town centres for longer, which the public have sought for us to do for many years, it will mean that this free hour can no longer be provided for Blue Badge holders in the 12 new pay on exit car parks. 

This is because a Blue Badge holder can travel in and display their Blue Badge in any vehicle – not just a single vehicle which has been specially adapted or qualifies for free tax and is registered with the Council. 

In pay and display car parks,  enforcement officers will be patrolling as before and so will see the Blue Badge displayed alongside the pay and display ticket on the vehicle and apply the additional one hour of free parking.

As the enforcement officers won’t be patrolling in the pay on exit car parks and it is not feasible to register every vehicle in which a Blue Badge holder may be travelling, it won’t be possible to apply an additional one hour of free parking in those 12 car parks.

Cabinet portfolio holder for transport, Geoff Brown, said the move to pay on exit would make it easier for customers as well as support local economies.

“Pay on exit parking has been shown to encourage people to stay longer in town centres as they don’t have to rush back to their car when their car parking ticket is running out.

“It also means civil enforcement officers (CEOs) will not be tied up having to check pay and display tickets. This frees them up to do more work taking action where cars are parked illegally – which we know frustrates residents,” he added.

All Blue Badge holders will, as long as the Badge is displayed correctly and your vehicle isn’t causing an obstruction, still be able to park on the road:

  • Yellow lines - for 3 hours or less
  • Disabled bays - for an unlimited time unless roadside signs show time limits
  • Limited parking areas - for an unlimited time

The pay on exit car parks will have disabled parking spaces.  The pay on exit technology is being rolled out from the end of February with all 12 car parks being changed over by Easter 2019.  The car parks are:-

  • Town Quarry, Falmouth
  • Main Car Park, Fowey
  • Milpool, Looe
  • St Georges Road, Newquay
  • The Manor, Newquay
  • Link Road, Padstow
  • Harbour, Penzance
  • The Island, St. Ives
  • Trenwith, St Ives
  • Garras Wharf, Truro
  • Moorfield, Truro
  • Old Bridge Street, Truro     

 

Story posted 21 January 2019

 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Owners of specially adapted Blue Badge vehicles urged to register with the Council to continue to receive free parking in ‘pay on exit’ car parks

Tue, 12/02/2019 - 15:36

Blue Badge holders who drive a specially adapted vehicle are urged to register their details with the Council so they can continue to park for free in Council car parks where new pay on exit technology is being rolled out.

Blue Badge holders who have a specially adapted vehicle are asked to register their vehicle from the 21 January 2019 by calling 0300 1234 222.   A registration form, including the relevant terms and conditions will be sent to the applicant.  Proof of a recognised vehicle adaption and a copy of the Blue Badge must be supplied as part of the registration process.

Customers who drive a specially adapted vehicle have not needed to register with the Council in the past as our enforcement officers are trained to spot those vehicles.  New technology needed to operate pay on exit car parks means this is no longer possible and, as we want to continue to provide free parking for adapted vehicles, we are asking people to register with us if they will be using them.  Blue Badge holders who drive specially adapted vehicles will still be able to park for free in all our other standard pay and display car parks even if they don’t register.

Blue Badge holders whose disabled vehicle qualifies for free tax and are already registering every year on the Council’s Disabled Exemption Scheme, won’t have to register twice.  The technology for pay on exit uses vehicle registration details and those who have a valid and current Disabled Exemption permit will be able to continue to park for free in both standard and pay on exit car parks without contacting us. 

Twelve car parks in 8 towns are the first to be moved over to pay on exit technology as part of the Council’s Positive Parking Framework.

The introduction of pay on exit technology in around 10% of our car parks will provide great benefits for the community as it will free up enforcement officers time to patrol the wider town centres, reducing traffic congestion from vehicles illegally parked on the highway. 

The Council will continue to operate the remaining 90% of its car parks without the new pay on exit technology and in those 100 + car parks, all Blue Badge holders who currently receive a discretionary additional free hour of parking on top of the time they pay for, will still be able to do so.  While the pay on exit technology provides improved access and allows users to stay longer in town centres for longer, which the public have sought for us to do for many years, it will mean that this free hour can no longer be provided for Blue Badge holders in the 12 new pay on exit car parks. 

This is because a Blue Badge holder can travel in and display their Blue Badge in any vehicle – not just a single vehicle which has been specially adapted or qualifies for free tax and is registered with the Council. 

In pay and display car parks,  enforcement officers will be patrolling as before and so will see the Blue Badge displayed alongside the pay and display ticket on the vehicle and apply the additional one hour of free parking.

As the enforcement officers won’t be patrolling in the pay on exit car parks and it is not feasible to register every vehicle in which a Blue Badge holder may be travelling, it won’t be possible to apply an additional one hour of free parking in those 12 car parks.

Cabinet portfolio holder for transport, Geoff Brown, said the move to pay on exit would make it easier for customers as well as support local economies.

“Pay on exit parking has been shown to encourage people to stay longer in town centres as they don’t have to rush back to their car when their car parking ticket is running out.

“It also means civil enforcement officers (CEOs) will not be tied up having to check pay and display tickets. This frees them up to do more work taking action where cars are parked illegally – which we know frustrates residents,” he added.

All Blue Badge holders will, as long as the Badge is displayed correctly and your vehicle isn’t causing an obstruction, still be able to park on the road:

  • Yellow lines - for 3 hours or less
  • Disabled bays - for an unlimited time unless roadside signs show time limits
  • Limited parking areas - for an unlimited time

The pay on exit car parks will have disabled parking spaces.  The pay on exit technology is being rolled out from the end of February with all 12 car parks being changed over by Easter 2019.  The car parks are:-

  • Town Quarry, Falmouth
  • Main Car Park, Fowey
  • Milpool, Looe
  • St Georges Road, Newquay
  • The Manor, Newquay
  • Link Road, Padstow
  • Harbour, Penzance
  • The Island, St. Ives
  • Trenwith, St Ives
  • Garras Wharf, Truro
  • Moorfield, Truro
  • Old Bridge Street, Truro     

 

Story posted 21 January 2019

 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Smallholders in St Austell plead guilty to breaching ban on keeping birds

Tue, 12/02/2019 - 13:24

At Truro Magistrates Court on 11 February 2019, Joanna Lutey (42) and Michael Jackson (31) who run a smallholding in St Austell, pleaded guilty to keeping poultry when banned.

On 23 January and again on 31 January 2019,  officers from Cornwall Council’s Animal Health team visited their smallholding and discovered 120 birds (geese, ducks and chickens) living there and living in unsuitable conditions, despite a ban on the couple keeping poultry.  The poultry has since been sold and are no longer at the smallholding. 

Cornwall Council originally prosecuted Miss Lutey and Mr Jackson in October 2018 when they were convicted of causing cruelty to birds.  Mr Jackson was given a 200 hour community service order and Miss Lutey a 100 hour community service order.  They were ordered to pay £4000 in costs and given a 10 year ban on keeping poultry. 

On 18 December 2018 the ban was appealed at Truro Crown Court, however the appeal was refused and Mr Jackson and Miss Lutey were given a month to dispose of their birds.

Due to their early guilty plea and the fact that the birds have now been removed, Miss Lutey and Mr Jackson were both given a 12 month conditional discharge and ordered to pay £1000 each towards the Council’s costs.

Sue James, Cornwall Council cabinet portfolio holder for environment and public protection said: “The outcome of this case shows the Council’s commitment to upholding orders of the court and ensuring the health and welfare of farm animals.  It’s important that we took this action in order to maintain the good reputation of the farming industry in Cornwall.”

 

Story posted 12 February 2019

Categories: Councils, Politics

Businesses in Cornwall urged to get Brexit ready

Tue, 12/02/2019 - 09:07

Guidance for businesses on how to prepare for trading in the event of a ‘no deal’ Brexit has been released today by Cornwall Council, the Cornwall Chamber of Commerce, and the Federation of Small Businesses.

Based on Government’s guidance on how to prepare your business if the UK leaves the EU without a deal, the 15-page guide summarises key information on how to prepare for possible new trading arrangements.

Leader of Cornwall Council, Adam Paynter, said: “With the ongoing uncertainty from the Government, we know a lot of our business owners are concerned about what a possible no deal Brexit will mean for them. We’ve turned some of Government’s information into a short guide to help businesses navigate their way through a no-deal scenario.”

As well as detailing issues for importing and exporting, the guide prompts businesses to consider a range of other issues, from transfers of personal data to trademarks, copyright and product labelling.

Ann Vandermeulen, Development Manager for FSB Cornwall, said: “No matter how small a business is, it is vital that support is available through these difficult times and that everyone can prepare in order to protect livelihoods, communities and our local economy.

“As a business owner, you may not yet be aware of all of the ways a no deal Brexit may affect you – we urge all of you to read this helpful toolkit to try and gain some insight. In these uncertain times it’s better to be safe than sorry and whilst businesses are resilient and flexible, we are warning them not to be complacent. We commend Cornwall Council for leading this collaboration with ourselves and the Chamber of Commerce to assist our valuable business community and we recommend that all businesses take note.”

Kim Conchie, Chief Executive Officer of Chamber of Commerce, said: “It is really important for businesses in the South West to understand how they may be affected by Brexit as the date to exit the EU gets closer. Even if you think your business will not be immediately affected, it is important to understand changes in trade laws and the way in which we will trade with the EU in the future. I would urge anyone in business to read this helpful guide put together by Cornwall Council, to help with your business planning in the short term.”

Businesses are also encouraged to consider what steps they can take to help their employees to apply for settlement through the EU Settlement Scheme, using Government’s employer toolkit. This week, the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Leadership Board also underlined the importance of EU nationals to the local economy, and encouraged them to apply to the scheme in an open letter.

The guidance can be found on Cornwall Council’s website at cornwall.gov.uk/brexit, which also signposts businesses to further information and support.

Posted on 11 February

Categories: Councils, Politics

Third premises closure in West Cornwall in anti-social behaviour clampdown

Mon, 11/02/2019 - 14:02

A property in Penzance has been secured with a closure order as part of Cornwall Council and partners’ bid to tackle anti-social behaviour – making it the third premises closure in West Penwith in a fortnight.

Cornwall Council’s Anti-Social Behaviour Team and Devon and Cornwall Police have been working in partnership with LiveWest Housing to deal with ongoing anti-social behaviour in Penzance.

On 30 January 2019 a Partial Closure Order was granted by Truro Magistrate's Court on a property in Trezela Road, Penzance.

The Partial Closure Order is in place for three months from the date of issue.

Access is now restricted to the named tenant of the premises and those who habitually reside at the property.

Dorian Thomas, Anti-Social Behaviour Caseworker at Cornwall Council, said: “The Partial Closure order was applied for in response to information provided by members of the public and agencies involved, showing how the tenant of the address allowed visitors to the property to cause alarm and distress to the community.  

“The tenant failed to manage their tenancy and allowed a number of breaches to occur within their agreement with LiveWest. This included allowing visitors to attend the address and have a free run of the premise and act in a disorderly manner. By allowing this behaviour to occur they also placed family members at risk.

“All agencies involved have worked closely to make this closure a success and improve the quality of life for the other residents within the location.”

Posted on 11 February

Categories: Councils, Politics

Supported business shows how a ‘diverse workforce brings innovation to the workplace’

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 11:33

Cornwall Council owned Tremorvah Industries, based in Threemilestone, boasts a diverse workforce with 70 per cent of them having a registered disability.

Tremorvah is the only supported business in Cornwall and is one of less than 50 across the whole of the UK. It delivers employment, development and training opportunities for people with disabilities and to help them, whenever possible, into mainstream employment.

Supported businesses receive funding from the Department of Work and Pensions but this is only 5% of Tremorvah’s income. Tremorvah used to rely on the Council for funding but this has now changed with the business now subsidy free from the council and generating income, with an annual turnover of around £2.5 million.

Diana Lobb, General Manager of Tremorvah Industries said: “We want to challenge perceptions of supported businesses and the employment of staff with disabilities.

“We aim to add real value to the local community while showing that people with disabilities have valuable transferable skills and a resilience that makes them hugely valuable employees.”

Latest data shows that an estimated 3.8 million people of working age with disabilities are in employment, an employment rate of 50.7 per cent, compared to 81.1 per cent for people without disabilities. That means 368,000 people with disabilities of working age are unemployed.

One of the main things you’ll notice when you walk into Tremorvah’s showroom is a massive range of equipment and furniture that supports people to live independently in their own home. The lived experiences of the staff mean they’re ideally placed to advise people on the sorts of equipment that will suit their needs.

Customer service manager Julie Kinney from Truro reflected on how she came to work at Tremorvah: “Coming to work at Tremorvah I was given the chance to grow and shown what I was capable of. It took the pressure off and actually halted my illness.

“You’re able to talk to customers on the same level because you know what they’re going through. It’s really rewarding seeing the difference you can make to someone’s life.”

Cornwall Council Portfolio Holder for Adults Rob Rotchell said: “It’s important to remember that we are all individuals with different skills and abilities who all bring different experiences to the work place.

“Tremorvah’s business model proves that with the right support and work environment people can flourish and succeed which in turn can show huge rewards for the business.”

Posted on 7 February

Categories: Councils, Politics

Council confirms bid for high street funding for Penzance

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 11:31

Cornwall’s bid to secure an allocation from the national £675m high street fund moved a step closer this week when Penzance was confirmed by Cornwall Council as the focus for its bid to Government.

Launched on the 26 December 2018, the Future High Streets Fund is key part of the Government’s plan for the High Street, providing co-funding towards capital projects that transform and regenerate town centres through innovative proposals around transport, housing delivery and our public services.

The Government’s criteria only allows one bid from each Local Authority area. Their direction is focused on clear objectives for High Streets that are facing significant challenges so Cornwall Council invited approaches through Town Councils with their partners which could maximise impact.

Penzance is being put forward by the Council due to the unique mix of regeneration opportunities available to tackle these challenges in the town and has been supported by local partners and stakeholders, the Penzance Place Shaping Board and Regeneration Group, businesses and community organisations.  It is likely to be a very competitive process and therefore we are backing a proposal that we hope meets all of the criteria.

Proposals for workspace, housing, connectivity, transport, skills and inclusion activity will be considered over the coming weeks to prepare the submission by March 22nd.

Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Planning and the Economy Bob Egerton said: “The High Streets Fund provides one opportunity to attract funding to Cornwall that will facilitate the delivery of regeneration projects. 

“The Penzance proposal is backed by extensive local support through and with the leadership of the Penzance Place Shaping Board.  While we are disappointed that we are only able to support one town in this first round of bidding, I am sure that Cornwall will get behind the Penzance bid to ensure that rural areas get their fair share of funding.”

Derek Thomas MP for West Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly (St Ives) said: “This exciting opportunity for Penzance will provide an important catalyst to ensure viability and vitality for our high street and promote much needed growth, jobs and skills provision for the whole town and beyond. Penzance is not short of ambition and aspiration and it is to the credit of a number of people here in West Cornwall that the Government has heard our plea and created the High St Fund. There is now a renewed opportunity for the community, businesses and organisations to come together to develop joined up proposals that will pave the way for future prosperity”.

Martin Tucker, Chair of the Penzance Place Shaping Board said: “This is an exciting opportunity for Penzance  and one in which all agencies can cooperate to develop a bid that both revitalises and inspires our high street to meet the needs of both local people and the many visitors to West Cornwall.

The support shown by Cornwall Council in recommending the town is a huge boost and the challenge is now to present an expression of interest to central government that is difficult for them not to support.”

Glenn Caplin, CEO of Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Enterprise Partnership and Service Director for Economic Growth said “Vibrant town centres are a place where business and community meet, jobs are created, businesses grow and prosperity is secured. However, the way that we use high streets is changing. We are supportive of all efforts to adapt to these changes and were impressed by the quality and innovation shown by towns that wanted the opportunity to bid for this fund. Whilst we are only able to take one forward at this time, we will continue to work with all towns in Cornwall to explore other opportunities that will help them deliver their vision”. 

The Council will now work with partners, stakeholders and businesses in Penzance to submit an expression of interest to Government by 22 March 2019.

 

Story posted 06 February 2019 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Invitation to learn more about current temporary overnight closure of Stratton Hospital Minor Injury Unit

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 11:30

Residents in Bude and the surrounding parishes are invited along to an extraordinary meeting of Bude Community Network Panel next week.

The meeting will take place at 7pm on Thursday 14 February in the Main Hall of Bude Parkhouse Centre at Ergue-Gaberic Way, Bude, EX23 8LD.

The session will provide an opportunity to hear an update on the current temporary overnight closure of Stratton Hospital Minor Injuries Unit.

Tamsyn Anderson, Director of Primary Care at Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, will give the update.

Cornwall Councillor Nicky Chopak, Chair of Bude Community Network Panel, said: “Everyone is welcome to come along and find out what’s happening with the current temporary overnight closure of Stratton Hospital.

“You'll be able to ask questions and give your views, so please take the opportunity to come along."

The extraordinary meeting is open to the public and everyone is welcome to attend.

Bude Community Network Panel meets several times a year to discuss matters that affect the local area and to progress these by working in partnership with Cornwall Council and its partners, including town and parish councils, the voluntary and community sector, and the police and health services. 

The Panel’s priorities include health, public transport, asset and service devolution, affordable housing, highways, traffic and parking issues.

Bude Community Network Panel includes all four Cornwall Councillors for the area and representatives of the 11 town and parish councils in the community network: Bude-Stratton, Jacobstow, Kilkhampton, Launcells, Marhamchurch, Morwenstow, North Tamerton, Poundstock, St. Gennys, Week St. Mary and Whitstone.

Following next week’s meeting, the next meeting of Bude Community Network Panel will be on April 8 at Bude Parkhouse Centre.  

For more information about Bude Community Network Panel meetings please ring 01579 341482 or email Zoe.Bernard-John@cornwall.gov.uk .

The agenda and more information about Bude Community Panel is here: /community-and-living/communities-and-devolution/community-networks/bude/

Posted 05 February 2019

Categories: Councils, Politics

Local Cornwall Councillors support proposal for a new Puffin Crossing in Penzance

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 11:30

Local Cornwall Councillors are supporting a proposal, now out for comment (until 22 February 2019), to build a new puffin crossing at Chyandour Brook, to benefit residents and visitors to Penzance.

Cornwall Councillors Simon Elliott, member for Ludgvan, and Mario Fonk, member for Gulval and Heamoor, are supporting the plans which will see the existing Chyandour Square refuge crossing replaced with a signalised crossing.

Cllr Simon Elliott said: “Parents from Long Rock have contacted me in the past concerned about the safety of their children walking into town and to school along this busy road. This crossing will help not only walkers from Long Rock safely access town (and through Chyandour Square on towards Gulval) but also surfers crossing to the Three Tunnels. It has my full support.”

Cllr Mario Fonk "I'm very pleased about this crossing.  It will make crossing this busy road a lot safer. This is a good example of local councillors working together to benefit the people that they represent."

Geoff Brown, Cornwall Council Cabinet portfolio holder for Transport said: “This is a great example of Cornwall Council listening to local concerns and then working with local members to deliver what the local community require.”

The scheme will be funded by developer contributions that are specifically for pedestrian improvements.

Details are available online. The proposals are also available at Penzance Library and Information Service, St John's Hall, Alverton St, Penzance TR18 2QW and at CORMAC, Reception, Radnor Road, Scorrier, TR16 5EH.  Further information can be obtained by telephoning 01872 326740.

Any comments of support, objections or other representations, specifying the grounds on which they are made, must be sent in writing to the Scorrier address no later than 22 February 2019.

 

Story posted 04 February 2019

Categories: Councils, Politics

Outstanding Wave Multi Academy Trust to provide education services for new adolescent mental health unit

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 11:27

Cornwall Council has commissioned Cornwall’s Wave Multi Academy Trust to provide education services for children and young people while they are receiving specialist treatment at Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust’s new child and adolescent mental health unit ‘Sowenna’. Sowenna is currently being built on the Bodmin Hospital site.

The new 14 bed unit will provide specialist mental health services for young people up to the age of 18 when it opens in the summer enabling them to be treated closer to their family and friends.

The new facility includes an education block to enable young people to continue with their education while they are staying in the unit. Announcing that Wave MAT had been commissioned to deliver education services, Dr Barbara Vann, Chair of Cornwall Partnership NHS Foundation Trust which is leading the CAMHS project, said “I am delighted that education of great quality will be offered by the Wave Multi Academy Trust.”

Sally Hawken, Cornwall Council’s portfolio holder for Children Schools and Families said:“ This facility is going to be life changing for children and families in Cornwall who have, for so long, been forced to travel to other parts of the country for the care they need.  I am delighted the Wave Multi Academy Trust has been chosen as the education provider because they have a clear track record of delivering outstanding education in a health environment to support the children at Sowenna”. 

Wave MAT currently runs the Community and Hospital Education Service (CHES) at the Royal Cornwall Hospital Treliske, as well as six other Alternative Provision academies across Cornwall, and three in Devon, and CEO Rob Gasson is delighted the MAT has been commissioned to deliver the education for the new CAMHS unit.

“Our well established and strong relationships with schools and the health service in Cornwall means that we are extremely well placed to ensure that the education of the young people using this facility can continue throughout their treatment” he said. 

“Our current CHES service has been judged as “outstanding” by Ofsted and we are looking forward to being able to provide the same high quality services for young people at Sowenna.  We are very proud of the quality of education we are providing for young people and this will enable us to ensure that there is a joined up approach to the education of young people in Cornwall who require this form of medical intervention”.

Research shows that an estimated 1 in 10 young people aged between 5 and 16 experience mental health difficulties. While most can be treated and supported within the community, some require a more intensive programme of treatment and care.

For children and young people with severe mental issues this has meant travelling hundreds of miles away from their family and friends to hospitals in Birmingham, Essex, Kent and Cheshire to access specialist psychiatric treatment. The opening of the new unit will mean that young people from Cornwall can be treated closer to home, enabling them to maintain their relationships and friendships.

Posted 25 January, 2019

Categories: Councils, Politics

Strategic partners sought to deliver first 750 Extra Care units for people in Cornwall

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 11:26

Submissions have now opened for a strategic partner to work with Cornwall Council deliver to deliver the first 750 extra care units for Cornwall residents.

The council has pledged to deliver over 3,500 extra care units by 2025.

Submissions are now being called for from either a single partner or a collaboration of partners to deliver the first 750 of these units.

Extra Care units offer people an alternative from residential care and allow them to live in their own homes with their own front door with care and support available around the clock if they need it.

Nearly 1 in 4 residents of Cornwall are aged over 65 and this number is set to increase by a further 40% over the next 20 years, highlighting the need for extra care homes to help people remain living independently.

Cornwall Council portfolio holder for Adults Rob Rotchell said: “Extra care homes are a good way for people to maintain their independence while also being able to access any care and support they might need.

“We want people to have a better range of living options so they can still live independently, within their community and near family and friends. Evidence shows that this leads to healthier and happier lives. This in turn reduces the need to use health and social care services, alleviating demand on already stretched services,” Councillor Rotchell said.

An extra care living facility in Liskeard is already supporting people to live independently with care and support available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week if needed.

Bruce Parker, who is in his early 70’s, has been living there with his wife since it opened. He said: “Living here has made such a difference, before when we were struggling we had no one, now all we have to do is press a button and the staff are there, they’re wonderful really”.

All of the proposed developments will be co-designed with local communities to recognise the different characters of towns in Cornwall.

The other ways in which this scheme will be delivered are:

  • Remodelling partners’ existing capacity (such as sheltered housing and care homes) that are no-longer fit for purpose.
  • Market shaping - to identify and develop opportunities with new and existing providers to deliver accommodation suitable for older people’s needs.
  • Direct development – there may be opportunities for the Council to directly build especially in areas where the market is less responsive.

Interested parties can apply through the Council’s Due North e-portal www.supplyingthesouthwest.org.uk and express an interest in “DN350137 Strategic partners for the development, delivery and operation of extra care houses in Cornwall”. New users to site will need to register.

Posted on 1 February

Categories: Councils, Politics

More Cornish towns able to bid for Future High Street Fund

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 11:24

Three more towns in Cornwall – St Austell, Camborne and Newquay – will be able to bid for money from the government’s Future High Street Fund after a government decision to allow more bids from Cornwall. 

The original Fund submission criteria only allowed only one bid from each Local Authority area. Following lobbying from Cornwall Council Leader Adam Paynter to treat rural areas like Cornwall fairly in the process, Cornwall will now be able to submit a total of four bids.

Earlier this week, the Council confirmed Penzance would be the focus for its bid for a share of the Fund – bids will now also be submitted for St Austell, Camborne and Newquay.

Councillor Paynter welcomed the decision by Government to allow the Council to submit more bids. “This is good news for Cornwall and could provide a much needed boost to local high streets. However, the criteria is still very challenging for a rural area like Cornwall and the timeframes for submission are tight. There are potentially for over 465 bids which could be submitted from towns across the country.”

Cornwall Council identified Penzance as the focus of Cornwall Council’s bid after it topped an expression of interest process which was sent out to Town Councils.

Penzance will be the main bid from Cornwall for the Future High Street Fund but there is now the opportunity to endorse bids from the towns that scored highly in the selection process if there is the resource to produce those bids locally to meet the bid deadline of 22 March 2019.

Launched on the 26 December 2018, the Future High Streets Fund is key part of the Government’s plan for the High Street, providing co-funding towards capital projects that transform and regenerate town centres through innovative proposals around transport, housing delivery and our public services.

The Government’s criteria is focused on clear objectives for high streets that are facing significant challenge.

Councillor Paynter stressed that the High Street Fund “is not the only show in town” and said Cornwall Council would continue to support and work with towns across Cornwall.

“Town centres are the lifeblood of communities across Cornwall and the Council has a track record of working with places to improve local economies.

“We are working with towns such as Hayle, Redruth, Liskeard and Torpoint on exciting plans for the future.  We have a Councillor led Scrutiny Panel looking at the Vitality of Towns.  It will make recommendations on how we can tackle the challenges town centres are facing by considering replacing retail with housing, work and leisure space,” he said.  

“We’ve also invested in place-shaping work to strengthen local economies and communities in Bodmin and Launceston. This is an agenda we are committed to and we will make sure that lessons learned from the High Street Fund and the findings from the scrutiny panel are shared with other communities across Cornwall.”

 

Story posted 08 February 2019

Categories: Councils, Politics

Drivers urged to take care after snow and ice hits Cornwall

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 10:41

Following a busy evening dealing with issues caused by yesterday’s snow, people are this morning being warned to take it easy on icy roads.

Drivers are being warned that icy conditions overnight may make the roads treacherous in parts, so please drive very carefully if you do need to go out. 

Last night hundreds of motorists were stranded following heavy snow on the A30 and A39, and many other routes saw treacherous dangerous driving conditions.

A tactical coordination group, bringing together representatives from Cornwall Council, Devon and Cornwall Police, Cornwall Fire and Rescue, NHS and Cornwall Search and Rescue, worked through the night to ensure all calls were responded to and the roads cleared.

Cornwall Council had gritters out yesterday at 2pm, 5.30pm and 9pm, treating routes in east Cornwall. Routes in the west were also covered at 3pm and midnight.

Highways England are responsible for maintenance of the A30 and also had crews working.

The gritters – operated by Cormac – again covered the east Cornwall routes again at 3am. Each route takes around three hours to cover.

Dozens of schools in Cornwall have now reported they are closed today – for detailed information on school closures and road conditions visit www.cornwall.gov.uk/snow

Councillor Geoff Brown, portfolio holder for transport at Cornwall Council, said it had been a challenging night, despite plenty of advance warning of the poor weather.

He said:  “We started issuing warnings about cold weather on Monday, and yesterday warned about snow and ice, road conditions and the action being taken.

“One of the biggest problems we encountered was that people abandoned their cars, which blocked the way for the emergency services and the gritters to get through.  This caused considerable delays in clearing the roads and left people stranded for longer than they should have been. We appreciate everyone wants to get home, but the actions of a few impacted on many.

“If you are stuck, stay with your car and wait until the roads are cleared. If you are vulnerable and need help, call the emergency services.

“Some of the specific incidents we dealt with were two school buses, one at Kingsley Village and one at Winnard’s Perch, which were stuck.  We reached both vehicles during the early evening, ensuring the children were safe and well.

“We had fire and rescue crews doing sweeps along the A30 and A39 to check people were OK while they waited for the roads to be cleared.”

“I would like to thank all of the agencies who worked so hard in some challenging circumstances. I can only praise the work of all of the services who dealt with the situation professionally and calmly.”

Councllor Brown also praised the community for rallying around to help those stranded. “There have been lots of offers of help on social media – the true spirit of Cornwall really shines when we are hit with difficult situations.”

News of any impact on bin and recycling collections will be available this morning through the council’s Twitter feed at www.twitter.com/CornwallCouncil

Story posted 1 February 2019

Categories: Councils, Politics

Technology is supporting adults to live independently at Pendennis House in Wadebridge

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 10:40

People with learning disabilities in Cornwall are being supported to live independently in their own homes with the help of Technology Enabled Care in Wadebridge.

As part of Cornwall Council’s Technology Enabled Care trials, four residents at Pendennis House, a ‘Supportive Lifestyle’ provider, have been using a sensor based monitoring system in their flats alongside a care and support package that is tailored to their needs.

One person that Pendennis House supports, Darren Rogers, lives in his own self-contained flat and has access to support when he needs it.  Previously he would have had to have someone in his home at night time to make sure he was safe but now, with the clever use of technology he is able to live more independently.

There are monitors in place around his home that detect movement so if any unplanned activity were to take place it would then alert staff in the nearby hub who could assist him if he needed it. He also has special assistance phone which allows him to call someone at the hub if he needs to.

Pendennis House Manager Nancy Jeffs said: “People we support are given a higher level of independence and using the sensor based technology means that they have less restriction placed on their life.   

“They can use the special assistance phone to contact someone should they need urgent help and staff are on hand seconds away if needed. We have seen people’s confidence levels soar using this technology and this has spread into other areas of their lives, having the confidence to pick and choose activities they want to get involved in.”

Cornwall Council portfolio holder for adults Rob Rotchell said: “ This is a great example of how technology can support people to live independently in their own home. Evolving technology within social care offers many opportunities to better help support people’s lives.”

The people Pendennis House support regularly enjoy a number of activities that they can choose to take part in, one of those being a musical session with Cornwall’s very own Britain’s Got Talent 2016 semi-finalist Josh Curnow.

Posted on 31 January 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Young carers in Cornwall urged to get the support they deserve

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 10:39

Young carers in Cornwall are encouraging other young people in a similar position to come forward and get the support they deserve.

There are an estimated 4,000 young people aged 25 and under providing unpaid care for their families across the County, but Cornwall Council is warning that around half of those are missing out on vital support.

As part of Young Carer’s Awareness Day (31 January 2019) a film featuring young people from across Cornwall is being launched to encourage more young carers to access the support services available to them.

The film has been produced by Kernow Young Carers and features young people like Bethany, she said: “I didn’t realise I was a carer when I was younger, because it was a gradual process, but it’s quite a responsibility when you are 9 or 10 years old.  When I was younger I used to look after my Nan, but when she passed away that’s when I started to look after my mum because she started to go downhill.

“There are stressful times when you are a carer and sometimes you do feel overwhelmed.  Young Carers is about going out and having an opportunity to do things you wouldn’t normally do; you’ve got a set date and something to look forward to.  It breaks up that time that you are at home looking after a parent or sibling and you learn a lot about yourself being a part of Cornwall Young Carers.”

Kernow Young Carers is an Action for Children project commissioned by Cornwall Council, to provide support, activities and support groups for young carers up to 25 years old who look after parents/carers, siblings and other family members.

The service is aimed at making sure their caring does not stop young carers having the same opportunities as all young people. This includes information, advice and guidance, activities and trips, short breaks, support groups, and support in schools.

Councillor Sally Hawken, Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Children and Young People said: “Young carers don’t always realise that they are a young carer; helping with medication, cooking, cleaning, or helping to dress the person they look after.  We offer a lot of support which can really make a difference to young carers. This Young Carer’s Awareness Day today, we are taking the opportunity to raise awareness of the information and support available to young carers in Cornwall.”

Over 700 young carers supported by Kernow Young Carers are referred due to their parent’s health problems, which can include disability or long term illness. Nearly 500 young people care for a sibling, and 180 care for parents with mental health problems such as depression and anxiety. Other reasons for young people becoming carers include parental substance misuse, caring for a grandparent who lives in the family home, and young adult carers who care for a partner.

Kernow Young Carers regularly attend schools to give information to pupils about the support available. They help schools to identify and support young carers, and can also offer 1-1 support where the caring role is having a significant impact on their own welfare and opportunities. They run activities in the holidays to give young carers a break from their caring role and have access to funding to give young carers a trip out on their own or with the person they care for.

Aaron is also part of Kernow Young Carers, he said: “I have been a young carer for a year or two, before I joined Kernow Young Carers, life was hard. Not knowing who’s out there or if anyone can help or show support?  Since day one I have loved it and the way I can just talk to people and they understand the situation I am in, because some people don’t understand the consequences of being a carer. For example going out with mates – I cannot do that because I am caring for my mum and brother.

“My grandad has been a rock for me and my mum because he takes us where we need to go in the car, and helps care for my mum and brother, so he knows the impact and what it’s like to look after someone. Being with Young Carers helps me talk about being a carer confidently to my mates and people who are going through the same but care for different relatives, and I can make new friends.

“I would like to say thank you to Kernow Young Carers and I would recommend them to anyone, and I would like to say if you care for anyone at any age, go speak to them, don’t hold back. It does not matter if you are five or 16, go speak to them and you will see the difference.”

If you are a young carer or know one please contact Kernow Young Carers.  Action for Children’s Kernow Young Carers can be contacted on 01872 321 486.

Referrals to Kernow Carers Service (Adults and children) can be made by calling 0800 587 8191.

The Young Carers Service is on Facebook at Kernow Young Carers.  More information is also available at https://www.supportincornwall.org.uk/kb5/cornwall/directory/carers.page

Categories: Councils, Politics

Council gears up for cold spell

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 10:37

With a cold blast hitting the whole of the UK in the coming days, Cornwall Council is ready and prepared to deal with any problems the weather may bring.

Officers from our Emergency Management service are monitoring the weather situation closely and are liaising with staff from other Council services and partner agencies to respond if required.

The Council’s gritters will be out whenever there is a risk of ice or snow, aiming to apply salt before the onset of freezing.  CORMAC carries out precautionary salting on 1400km of the most heavily trafficked A and B roads which between them are responsible for around 80% of traffic movements.

The Council recently took stock of a top-up delivery of salt from Northern Ireland, which was unloaded at Fowey Docks and transferred to depots across Cornwall.

Even where a road has been gritted, motorists should never assume that a road is safe as black ice, freezing rain and sudden hail storms as well as snow can lead to hazardous driving conditions.

 

Councillor Geoff Brown, portfolio holder for transport, said:  “If we see really bad weather, we’re advising people to avoid travelling unless their journey is essential. If you have to drive, please take extra care and drive in accordance to the road and weather conditions.

“Reduce your speed, allow extra distance between yourself and other vehicles, and keep an eye out for pedestrians.  Remember, roads can still be treacherously icy even when the sun is shining, so take extra care.”

One of the other key areas for concern will be for rough sleepers across Cornwall, who are left extremely vulnerable when the weather gets cold.

The Council, in partnership with Cornwall Housing, St Petroc’s Society and other organisations, will be providing emergency accommodation and other services over the next few days as temperatures are predicted to fall.  

Residents concerned about someone sleeping rough can contact  Streetlink – a 24/7 website, mobile app which can be downloaded free from iTunes and Google Play stores and phone line (03005000914) which allows anyone who has a concern, to send out an alert about the location of someone sleeping rough.

Streetlink will then pass on the information to St Petroc’s Assertive Outreach Team so that they find, engage with the person and connect them with support within 24 hours.

Andrew Mitchell, portfolio holder for homes, said:  “We work all year round with rough sleepers to help them find permanent accommodation, and to help them access support services. Due to their vulnerability to cold weather, we will be doing all we can to ensure they have access to warmth and shelter during any extreme weather.”

If we see weather which affects schools or rubbish collection, information will be available on the Council’s website ww.cornwall.gov.uk/snow and on the Council’s Twitter feed - @CornwallCouncil. 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Plans put forward to support community led projects to help tackle loneliness in Cornwall

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 09:30

Grass roots projects could be eligible to apply for grant funding under proposals to tackle the issue of loneliness and social isolation in Cornwall.

This is part of the Prevention Services business plan being presented at the Overview Health and Social Care Scrutiny Committee today (23 January).

The grant funding will focus on helping local community projects to get started, grow and develop with Cornwall Council proposing to match fund up to 80% of the projects with the other 20% being supported through crowd funding.

This is just one of the proposals being put forward to reduce social isolation and homelessness by improving the way that people access information and advice, helping people to manage their own health and wellbeing and to maximise their independence.

The Prevention Services business case is in its final stages of development with Cornwall Council health and social care commissioners working with a range of service providers and other professionals, as well as people who currently use these sorts of services, to finalise the arrangement which will cover the next four years.

Cornwall has a higher than average number of older people with 24% of the population aged 65 and over, 21% of people with a limiting long term illness and 12% of the population providing unpaid care. These numbers are set to increase over the coming years and with the amount of funding that the council receives from the government decreasing each year Cornwall Council is taking an innovative approach.

From September 2016 to October 2018 an extensive period of engagement and consultation has taken place to help shape these proposals. Cornwall Council portfolio holder for Adults Rob Rotchell said: “Residents have told us they want to take more responsibility for their wellbeing and wellness, be as independent as possible and remain part of their local community.

“Providers have told us that making small steps can make a big difference such as getting people to smile, getting people out of their home for a cup of tea, getting people to eventually attend an activity in their community. This is why we are keen for community projects to help as they are better served to know who is in their community and how best to support them.”

The other proposals include:

  • Identifying a lead partner (or partnership) to work with Cornwall Council Adult Social Care and with care providers to improve links to the voluntary sector and coordinate volunteer support.
  • One countywide contract offering support to people that are rough sleeping or homeless, or are at risk of rough sleeping or being homeless.
  • Direct access accommodation with support for typically no more than six weeks for people who are homeless. (This contract is already in place but has been included as it forms part of the new model).
  • One countywide community outreach contract delivering short term support with independent living skills and self-management of health and wellbeing for people with physical health needs, learning disabilities and any other health needs.
  • Five locality-based supported accommodation and community outreach contracts delivering short term support with independent living skills and self-management of health and wellbeing for people with mental health, substance misuse needs and any other complex needs.

Contracts will start in autumn 2019 following a competitive tender process.

Posted on 23 January 2019

Categories: Councils, Politics

More improvements in Newquay to encourage walking and cycling

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 09:29

A new proposal to make it easier for residents and visitors to enjoy Newquay by cycling and walking is now out for comment.

The plan, to build a number of pedestrian and cycle improvements at the intersection of Bank Street and Lower Marcus Hill, will see additional paved crossing points and a new cycle connection between the Tram tracks and the existing cycle way on Manor Road. The changes to the junction with Marcus Hill will improve pedestrian safety, and slow vehicles, at this busy junction whilst removing the "no left turn" from St Michael's Road.

Providing and promoting better cycling and walking routes as alternative methods to getting around by car is a key part of our Connecting Cornwall aims to make it easier for walkers and cyclists to enjoy safe and easy access to town centres across Cornwall.

Cornwall Council cabinet portfolio holder for transport and local Cornwall Councillor for Newquay Central Geoff Brown said:  “These improvements will help those walking in and around the town centre and provide the missing link for cyclists to easily get to the western part of the town via the Tram tracks and Manor Road.  It has my full support.”

The £125,000 scheme will be jointly funded by the Council’s Local Transport Plan and developer contributions for pedestrian and cycle improvements in the town.

It complements the other recent Council investments in walking and cycling paths along Henver Road and the Barrowfields where the Council built multi-use paths which opened in 2016.

Recent survey counts for one weekday in mid-September last year demonstrated that more people are using those paths and cycle ways with 634 trips made on the Barrowfields path, including 86 by bike, and over 150 cycle trips made on Henver Road on the same day.

The public are invited to comment on the plans from 22 January to 13 February 2019.  Construction could start in mid-May and finish in June with work suspended during the late spring holiday half term break.

The plan is to keep Manor Road and East Street open during the day to avoid disruption to bus services.   Where works need a full road closures, these are likely to  be carried out during the night.

Full details of the scheme are on the Cornwall Council Consultation Finder webpage.

Posted on 23 January 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Council agree to invest £1m to explore bringing tin mining back to Cornwall

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 09:27

Plans to reopen South Crofty Mine near Pool, reviving a traditional Cornish industry and bringing well paid jobs to Cornwall, were given a boost today when full Council  agreed to invest £1 million in a share offering by Strongbow Exploration, the owners of South Crofty tin mine to assess viability. 

The mine closed in 1998, marking the end of one of Cornwall’s historic industries. Strongbow, the company that owns the mine, is planning to dewater the mine which will then lead to confirmation of the mineral resources in the mine and further investment to enable tin production to restart.

Cabinet portfolio holder for economy and development Bob Egerton said: “Cornwall has a global reputation for exporting expertise and knowledge in mining and the Cabinet were clear in their desire to support this sector to re-start production in Cornwall and bring with it much needed high value jobs.

“If successful, restarting mining at South Crofty could create over 300 jobs and make a real differences to an area with high levels of deprivation.  

“I would stress we are at an early stage and will be working closely with Strongbow to test this is a viable prospect, with today’s full Council decision confirming support to explore this.”

 

Story posted 22 January 2019

Categories: Councils, Politics

Council agrees £39.3 million investment in more homes for temporary accommodation

Fri, 08/02/2019 - 09:24

Up to 250 homes for people in need of temporary accommodation will be purchased by the Council following a decision by members at today’s Council meeting  (22 January 2019).

The homes will be spread throughout Cornwall so that those who find themselves in need of a temporary home whilst they are helped to find a more permanent option, can still be near work, school and family.

Self-contained accommodation will be provided for families with children and there will be shared accommodation for single people or couples with no children.

Cornwall Council received more than 800 homeless applications during 2017, and these plans will allow a more flexible response suited to people’s needs, avoiding the use of bed and breakfast accommodation.

There are currently 267 households in temporary accommodation in Cornwall with around a third of that number in bed and breakfast or hotels because the Council does not have enough temporary accommodation of its own to offer them.

Cornwall Council cabinet portfolio holder for homes Andrew Mitchell said: “How we help those in need is a measure of the society we live in.  This decision is about making sure that we help those who, for whatever reason, are in danger of no longer having a roof over their head or a place to call home.

“More and more often, we are being approached by families who find themselves in this dire situation and we have a legal as well as a moral duty to help them.

“Not only is bed and breakfast and hotel accommodation unsuitable, particularly for families, it is also very expensive.

“Providing good quality, affordable, temporary accommodation in locations where it is needed ensures people have somewhere safe to stay, provides stability and gives people a better chance to find or keep work.”

In 2017, the Council received 9,967 requests for housing advice and over 800 homelessness applications.

It is envisaged that the 250 homes for temporary accommodation will be managed by Cornwall Housing Limited who are already commissioned to deliver housing options and homelessness services on behalf of the Council.

Cornwall has in recent years been among the top providers in the country of new affordable homes. Last year, 3,400 new homes were built in Cornwall, and over 900 of these were affordable housing. People wishing to rent or buy one of these affordable homes must have a connection to Cornwall and already be living here.

The Council is directly investing £200m to directly deliver 1,000 new homes built in the right locations with the right infrastructure around them.

 

Story posted 22 January 2019

Categories: Councils, Politics