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Devolution in action shows how place making in Cornwall is shaping the future

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Fri, 13/07/2018 - 19:30

Putting power as close to the community as possible was a key theme during a visit by the Secretary of State for Communities the Rt Hon James Brokenshire MP.

Par Running Track Presentation

Cornwall is the first and only non-metropolitan area to strike a devolution deal with Government, signed in 2015. On the third anniversary of the deal, Mr Brokenshire saw first-hand how powers and funding devolved from Government to Cornwall are helping improve the lives of local people. He met Cornish residents who have benefited from support to grow their businesses and make their homes cheaper to heat under devolution.

Ultra-localism is a central plank of Mr Brokenshire’s vision for communities. He visited Cornwall to see how Cornwall Council is using the powers devolved from Government – and also devolving power from the Council to local people, under an approach called ‘double devolution’. The Secretary of State met local voluntary groups, town and parish councillors at Par Running Track and St Austell to hear from them how local people are benefiting from the Council’s approach to putting community facilities and services back under local control. The Secretary of State also learnt about the 40 new buses, all equipped with wi-fi and contactless payment, which Cornwall Council has secured using its devolved bus franchising powers.

Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly has a bold and ambitious plan called New Frontiers, which seeks further devolution from Government to help our economy and society flourish beyond Brexit.

Mr Brokenshire met members of the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Leadershp Board to discuss its New Frontiers plan to position Cornwall post-Brexit as a growing economy in global industries such renewable energy, creative and digital technologies, space technology and lithium mining, while safeguarding traditional industries such as agriculture and fishing. New Frontiers would create 28,000 jobs and increase Cornwall’s contribution to the national economy by £2 billion.

Secretary of State for Communities, Rt Hon James Brokenshire MP said:

“This Government announced a devolution deal for Cornwall three years ago – the first of its kind in England. It heralded the start of a new age of localism, giving people ownership of the places they live.

“I’m delighted to see this deal in action – from the state-of-the-art buses, to the Par Running Track. Through being locally controlled, these have become huge community assets and I congratulate everyone involved for making them such a success.

“Giving power and money back from Whitehall builds stronger communities and devolution will continue to play a large part of ensuring our country’s future success as we build a Britain fit for the future.”

Leader of Cornwall Council and Chair of the Leadership Board for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly Adam Paynter said: “Cornwall is living proof that when power and control is devolved to communities, we can deliver better outcomes for people.

“Cornwall Council’s commitment to ‘double devolution’ means we are not just winning devolved powers from Government to Cornwall, but giving powers from the Council to local communities. We are putting hundreds of community assets and services back under local control, working with Cornwall’s fantastic voluntary groups, and town and parish councils.

“The powers Government devolved to Cornwall are enabling the Council and partners to make a real difference to people’s lives – levering in millions of pounds of extra investment to secure a new fleet of buses, make the homes of thousands of vulnerable households cheaper to heat, and support thousands of local businesses to start up and grow on.

“Our New Frontiers plan proposes even more ambitious plans for Cornwall. We believe that the more powers we have in Cornwall, the more we can, collectively, do for Cornwall – making it a better place to live, work and run a business.”

Chair of the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly LEP Mark Duddridge said:

“Cornwall’s devolution deal with Government is making a real difference to our region, supporting business growth and the development of our distinctive strengths in sectors such as renewable energy. Building on this strong track record, I hope Government will support our New Frontiers plan which includes piloting a Local Industrial Strategy to unleash the potential of our space and satellite, creative and digital, and other sector strengths to grow Cornwall and the national economy.”

During the visit Mr Brokenshire praised the achievements of the Par Running Track community group. In April 2018, Cornwall Council transferred the management of the running track, football pitches and changing facilities to Par Track Ltd – a Community Benefit Society including local residents and track users. Progress is also underway to further transfer the adjacent skate park for both sites to be run as a single entity.

He also commemorated the achievements of St Austell Town Council. Cornwall Council has worked closely with St Austell on a phased ‘total place’ devolution package for multiple town assets and services – driven by the belief that St Austell is their best long-term custodian and most able to shape services to meet local need.

Beginning in 2016 with the transfer of responsibility for allotments and public conveniences, the town has subsequently taken control of over 20 community sites and services – including 39 areas of public open spaces and play areas, and a major agency agreement that includes responsibility to undertake grounds maintenance and other works for sites such as open and closed churchyards and highways. The most recent phase has also seen transfer of the library, community buildings and two car parks.

During the visit the Secretary of State was briefed on Cornwall Councils’ focus on localism and double devolution, which is giving local communities more influence on say on how money is spent and used in their area, with over 300 initiatives in train from keeping libraries and parks open and running tracks like the one in Par in full use.

This included delivery of key projects under Cornwall’’s first devolution deal:

  • Improvements to Cornwall’s public transport system such as using bus franchising powers devolved from Whitehall to lever £17 million of private investment into the Cornish bus network, delivering contactless payment, smart ticketing, a new 41-strong bus fleet and new mainline railway stock.
  • How the Council secured £7.5 million private investment for the region’s Warm and Well programme, making the homes of 1,300 vulnerable households in Cornwall cheaper to heat every year.
  • Investment in new energy technologies such as deep geothermal energy that could provide - along with marine renewable energy - electricity for thousands of homes, which would see the region become a major energy producing area of the country.
  • The launch of a £40million Business Investment Fund with partners like the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly LEP, which will be used to accelerate the growth of local small and medium sized businesses in Cornwall, providing them with loan funding from £25k to £2m.

Story posted 13 July 2018 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Devolution in action shows how place making in Cornwall is shaping the future

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Fri, 13/07/2018 - 19:30

Putting power as close to the community as possible was a key theme during a visit by the Secretary of State for Communities the Rt Hon James Brokenshire MP.

Par Running Track Presentation

Cornwall is the first and only non-metropolitan area to strike a devolution deal with Government, signed in 2015. On the third anniversary of the deal, Mr Brokenshire saw first-hand how powers and funding devolved from Government to Cornwall are helping improve the lives of local people. He met Cornish residents who have benefited from support to grow their businesses and make their homes cheaper to heat under devolution.

Ultra-localism is a central plank of Mr Brokenshire’s vision for communities. He visited Cornwall to see how Cornwall Council is using the powers devolved from Government – and also devolving power from the Council to local people, under an approach called ‘double devolution’. The Secretary of State met local voluntary groups, town and parish councillors at Par Running Track and St Austell to hear from them how local people are benefiting from the Council’s approach to putting community facilities and services back under local control. The Secretary of State also learnt about the 40 new buses, all equipped with wi-fi and contactless payment, which Cornwall Council has secured using its devolved bus franchising powers.

Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly has a bold and ambitious plan called New Frontiers, which seeks further devolution from Government to help our economy and society flourish beyond Brexit.

Mr Brokenshire met members of the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Leadershp Board to discuss its New Frontiers plan to position Cornwall post-Brexit as a growing economy in global industries such renewable energy, creative and digital technologies, space technology and lithium mining, while safeguarding traditional industries such as agriculture and fishing. New Frontiers would create 28,000 jobs and increase Cornwall’s contribution to the national economy by £2 billion.

Secretary of State for Communities, Rt Hon James Brokenshire MP said:

“This Government announced a devolution deal for Cornwall three years ago – the first of its kind in England. It heralded the start of a new age of localism, giving people ownership of the places they live.

“I’m delighted to see this deal in action – from the state-of-the-art buses, to the Par Running Track. Through being locally controlled, these have become huge community assets and I congratulate everyone involved for making them such a success.

“Giving power and money back from Whitehall builds stronger communities and devolution will continue to play a large part of ensuring our country’s future success as we build a Britain fit for the future.”

Leader of Cornwall Council and Chair of the Leadership Board for Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly Adam Paynter said: “Cornwall is living proof that when power and control is devolved to communities, we can deliver better outcomes for people.

“Cornwall Council’s commitment to ‘double devolution’ means we are not just winning devolved powers from Government to Cornwall, but giving powers from the Council to local communities. We are putting hundreds of community assets and services back under local control, working with Cornwall’s fantastic voluntary groups, and town and parish councils.

“The powers Government devolved to Cornwall are enabling the Council and partners to make a real difference to people’s lives – levering in millions of pounds of extra investment to secure a new fleet of buses, make the homes of thousands of vulnerable households cheaper to heat, and support thousands of local businesses to start up and grow on.

“Our New Frontiers plan proposes even more ambitious plans for Cornwall. We believe that the more powers we have in Cornwall, the more we can, collectively, do for Cornwall – making it a better place to live, work and run a business.”

Chair of the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly LEP Mark Duddridge said:

“Cornwall’s devolution deal with Government is making a real difference to our region, supporting business growth and the development of our distinctive strengths in sectors such as renewable energy. Building on this strong track record, I hope Government will support our New Frontiers plan which includes piloting a Local Industrial Strategy to unleash the potential of our space and satellite, creative and digital, and other sector strengths to grow Cornwall and the national economy.”

During the visit Mr Brokenshire praised the achievements of the Par Running Track community group. In April 2018, Cornwall Council transferred the management of the running track, football pitches and changing facilities to Par Track Ltd – a Community Benefit Society including local residents and track users. Progress is also underway to further transfer the adjacent skate park for both sites to be run as a single entity.

He also commemorated the achievements of St Austell Town Council. Cornwall Council has worked closely with St Austell on a phased ‘total place’ devolution package for multiple town assets and services – driven by the belief that St Austell is their best long-term custodian and most able to shape services to meet local need.

Beginning in 2016 with the transfer of responsibility for allotments and public conveniences, the town has subsequently taken control of over 20 community sites and services – including 39 areas of public open spaces and play areas, and a major agency agreement that includes responsibility to undertake grounds maintenance and other works for sites such as open and closed churchyards and highways. The most recent phase has also seen transfer of the library, community buildings and two car parks.

During the visit the Secretary of State was briefed on Cornwall Councils’ focus on localism and double devolution, which is giving local communities more influence on say on how money is spent and used in their area, with over 300 initiatives in train from keeping libraries and parks open and running tracks like the one in Par in full use.

This included delivery of key projects under Cornwall’’s first devolution deal:

  • Improvements to Cornwall’s public transport system such as using bus franchising powers devolved from Whitehall to lever £17 million of private investment into the Cornish bus network, delivering contactless payment, smart ticketing, a new 41-strong bus fleet and new mainline railway stock.
  • How the Council secured £7.5 million private investment for the region’s Warm and Well programme, making the homes of 1,300 vulnerable households in Cornwall cheaper to heat every year.
  • Investment in new energy technologies such as deep geothermal energy that could provide - along with marine renewable energy - electricity for thousands of homes, which would see the region become a major energy producing area of the country.
  • The launch of a £40million Business Investment Fund with partners like the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly LEP, which will be used to accelerate the growth of local small and medium sized businesses in Cornwall, providing them with loan funding from £25k to £2m.

Story posted 13 July 2018 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Have your say on Porthtowan traffic and parking

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Fri, 13/07/2018 - 16:41

People in Porthtowan are being asked to share their views on the village’s traffic and parking arrangements at a public engagement session in the Boardroom of The Blue Bar from 3-7pm on Thursday 19 July.

CORMAC and Cornwall Council highways officers will be on hand to listen to the public’s ideas to improve the parking situation on Beach Road, West Beach Road and Sandy Road.  The range of ideas for improvements could include a 20mph speed limit in the village, moving the bus stop to a new location opposite the village hall, extending the existing restricted parking zone months to match those in the car park, short-term parking opportunities throughout the village or removing the height barrier from the main car park.

Any future schemes that may emerge as village priorities from the engagement session will be subject to funding availability and competition against other Cornwall Council priority schemes.

There is also an online questionnaire for those who are unable to attend the engagement session.  The questionnaire will be available until 14 September and the results will be published on the Cornwall Council and St Agnes Parish Council websites in mid-November.

Joyce Duffin, Cornwall Councillor for Mount Hawke and Portreath, said: “The public engagement session is the first step towards improving traffic management in the village.  Come and tell us what you think would be the best improvements to the village to make it better.  We’ll use your comments and feedback to shape a formal consultation on the best options for Porthtowan, and this will put us in a better position to seek funding for changes local people would like to see.”

Story posted 13 July 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

Have your say on Porthtowan traffic and parking

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Fri, 13/07/2018 - 16:41

People in Porthtowan are being asked to share their views on the village’s traffic and parking arrangements at a public engagement session in the Boardroom of The Blue Bar from 3-7pm on Thursday 19 July.

CORMAC and Cornwall Council highways officers will be on hand to listen to the public’s ideas to improve the parking situation on Beach Road, West Beach Road and Sandy Road.  The range of ideas for improvements could include a 20mph speed limit in the village, moving the bus stop to a new location opposite the village hall, extending the existing restricted parking zone months to match those in the car park, short-term parking opportunities throughout the village or removing the height barrier from the main car park.

Any future schemes that may emerge as village priorities from the engagement session will be subject to funding availability and competition against other Cornwall Council priority schemes.

There is also an online questionnaire for those who are unable to attend the engagement session.  The questionnaire will be available until 14 September and the results will be published on the Cornwall Council and St Agnes Parish Council websites in mid-November.

Joyce Duffin, Cornwall Councillor for Mount Hawke and Portreath, said: “The public engagement session is the first step towards improving traffic management in the village.  Come and tell us what you think would be the best improvements to the village to make it better.  We’ll use your comments and feedback to shape a formal consultation on the best options for Porthtowan, and this will put us in a better position to seek funding for changes local people would like to see.”

Story posted 13 July 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

Stay barbeque safe this summer

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Fri, 13/07/2018 - 16:28

Now that the warm, light evenings are with us and the summer holidays are fast approaching, barbecues are beginning to sizzle across Cornwall. But behind the bangers and burgers, summer fun has a serious side.

Cornwall Fire, Rescue and Community Safety Service, as part of the national fire safety campaign, is asking people to take extra care when using barbecues.  

Watch Manager Mark Grenfell said: “It’s natural to want to go outdoors and enjoy the warmer weather with family and friends - many of us can’t wait to get the barbecue lit.

“The biggest danger is the use of flammable liquids to light  barbecues. We’ve had a couple of occasions where people have poured petrol onto the charcoal in an effort to get it going and the reaction has, not surprisingly, been violent and highly dangerous. Prepare well in advance and light the charcoal early.

“If you’ve planned a barbecue and the weather lets you down, don’t take the barbecue indoors or into a tent.  In recent years, some people have sadly succumbed to carbon monoxide poisoning, so please be careful.”

Top tips to ensure a safe, enjoyable barbecue:

  • Never leave a lit barbecue unattended
  • Follow the safety instructions provided with disposable barbecues  
  • Never use a barbecue indoors
  • Make sure your barbecue is well away from sheds, fences, trees, shrubs or garden waste
  • Keep children, pets and garden games away from the cooking area
  • After cooking, make sure the barbecue is cool before moving it
  • Use enough charcoal to cover the base of the barbecue, but not more
  • Empty ashes onto soil, not into dustbins or wheelie bins.   If they’re hot, they can melt the plastic and cause a fire
  • Enjoy yourself, but don’t drink too much alcohol if you’re in charge of the barbecue
  • Always keep a bucket of water, sand or a garden hose nearby for emergencies.

Councillor Sue James, Cornwall Council Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Environment and Public Protection said:  “Everyone loves a barbecue. They can be a great social event and are the perfect way to cook whilst enjoying the summer sunshine.

“However, there are dangers, and people do need to take care.  By following these simple tips, people can make sure they make the most of the weather without putting themselves or others in danger.”

Categories: Councils, Politics

Stay barbeque safe this summer

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Fri, 13/07/2018 - 16:28

Now that the warm, light evenings are with us and the summer holidays are fast approaching, barbecues are beginning to sizzle across Cornwall. But behind the bangers and burgers, summer fun has a serious side.

Cornwall Fire, Rescue and Community Safety Service, as part of the national fire safety campaign, is asking people to take extra care when using barbecues.  

Watch Manager Mark Grenfell said: “It’s natural to want to go outdoors and enjoy the warmer weather with family and friends - many of us can’t wait to get the barbecue lit.

“The biggest danger is the use of flammable liquids to light  barbecues. We’ve had a couple of occasions where people have poured petrol onto the charcoal in an effort to get it going and the reaction has, not surprisingly, been violent and highly dangerous. Prepare well in advance and light the charcoal early.

“If you’ve planned a barbecue and the weather lets you down, don’t take the barbecue indoors or into a tent.  In recent years, some people have sadly succumbed to carbon monoxide poisoning, so please be careful.”

Top tips to ensure a safe, enjoyable barbecue:

  • Never leave a lit barbecue unattended
  • Follow the safety instructions provided with disposable barbecues  
  • Never use a barbecue indoors
  • Make sure your barbecue is well away from sheds, fences, trees, shrubs or garden waste
  • Keep children, pets and garden games away from the cooking area
  • After cooking, make sure the barbecue is cool before moving it
  • Use enough charcoal to cover the base of the barbecue, but not more
  • Empty ashes onto soil, not into dustbins or wheelie bins.   If they’re hot, they can melt the plastic and cause a fire
  • Enjoy yourself, but don’t drink too much alcohol if you’re in charge of the barbecue
  • Always keep a bucket of water, sand or a garden hose nearby for emergencies.

Councillor Sue James, Cornwall Council Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Environment and Public Protection said:  “Everyone loves a barbecue. They can be a great social event and are the perfect way to cook whilst enjoying the summer sunshine.

“However, there are dangers, and people do need to take care.  By following these simple tips, people can make sure they make the most of the weather without putting themselves or others in danger.”

Categories: Councils, Politics

Local reports help shape Safer Penzance patrols, with disruptive individuals moved on and warnings issued

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Fri, 13/07/2018 - 15:43

Resident concerns about issues such as street drinking and anti-social behaviour are being tackled by Cornwall Council's Anti-Social Behaviour Team and local police undertaking a series of patrols in Penzance during June which have seen disruptive individuals moved on or issued with warnings.

Part of the Safer Penzance initiative, the patrols focus on hotspots reported to the police by the local community. During the patrols, officers have used their enforcement powers on a small number of individuals causing disruption, including six people who were asked to leave the town centre and told not to return for up to 48 hours.

The town centre's Public Space Protection Order has also meant police officers have been able to require people to stop drinking and surrender their alcohol. Fourteen anti-social behaviour warnings were issued in June.

While the patrols have seen police and anti-social behaviour officers step in when needed, the patrols also provide immediate support for vulnerable people who may be struggling with substance abuse issues

Addaction workers are providing daily outreach sessions to vulnerable adults on the street, talking to the local residents and businesses and safely disposing of any drugs litter found. The outreach work helps keen both those who use outreach services, and the local community, safe.

Councillor Sue James, Cornwall Council's cabinet member for environment and public protection reiterated that anti-social behaviour or criminal activity would not be tolerated.

"As the recent Golowan festival showed, Penzance is a welcoming and friendly town with a lot to be proud of. While there are issues with anti-social behaviour at times, it definitely is not the 'no go' area it has been portrayed as recently," she said.

"Highly visible joint patrols are sending a clear message that we will not tolerate anti-social behaviour and providing reassurance for local people. However, some of the issues we are dealing with are long term and entrenched and will take a continued joined-up approach and bi-partisan support, to tackle. We can only solve these issues if we work together with the community.

“Local intelligence reported to police is providing useful information for the patrols to follow up, and reinforces how important it is for people to report concerns or issues so we can tackle them.  

Police host drop in sessions

Devon & Cornwall Police are running a series of drop in sessions at St John’s Hall in Penzance where residents and businesses can talk to officers for advice and support if they are concerned about crime and anti-social behaviour.

“We would encourage anyone with concerns about crime and anti-social behaviour in the town to call in at one of our drop-in sessions. It is really important that we have a true picture of what is happening in the area and we rely on the public to tell us what is going on,” said Penzance police inspector, Nicholas Clarke.

Police drop in sessions at St John's Hall are taking place on:

  • Thursday 12 July between 10am and 12noon
  • Tuesday 17 July between 5pm and 7pm
How to report concerns

Residents can report anti-social behaviour to the police online by emailing 101@dc.police.uk or by calling 101 for non-emergencies and in an emergency call 999. If you have information about a crime you can also contact Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111. For concerns about rubbish such as glass and needles on the street, call Cornwall Council Refuse and Recycling on 0300 1234 141 or email refuseandrecycling@cornwall.gov.uk.

 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Local reports help shape Safer Penzance patrols, with disruptive individuals moved on and warnings issued

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Fri, 13/07/2018 - 15:43

Resident concerns about issues such as street drinking and anti-social behaviour are being tackled by Cornwall Council's Anti-Social Behaviour Team and local police undertaking a series of patrols in Penzance during June which have seen disruptive individuals moved on or issued with warnings.

Part of the Safer Penzance initiative, the patrols focus on hotspots reported to the police by the local community. During the patrols, officers have used their enforcement powers on a small number of individuals causing disruption, including six people who were asked to leave the town centre and told not to return for up to 48 hours.

The town centre's Public Space Protection Order has also meant police officers have been able to require people to stop drinking and surrender their alcohol. Fourteen anti-social behaviour warnings were issued in June.

While the patrols have seen police and anti-social behaviour officers step in when needed, the patrols also provide immediate support for vulnerable people who may be struggling with substance abuse issues

Addaction workers are providing daily outreach sessions to vulnerable adults on the street, talking to the local residents and businesses and safely disposing of any drugs litter found. The outreach work helps keen both those who use outreach services, and the local community, safe.

Councillor Sue James, Cornwall Council's cabinet member for environment and public protection reiterated that anti-social behaviour or criminal activity would not be tolerated.

"As the recent Golowan festival showed, Penzance is a welcoming and friendly town with a lot to be proud of. While there are issues with anti-social behaviour at times, it definitely is not the 'no go' area it has been portrayed as recently," she said.

"Highly visible joint patrols are sending a clear message that we will not tolerate anti-social behaviour and providing reassurance for local people. However, some of the issues we are dealing with are long term and entrenched and will take a continued joined-up approach and bi-partisan support, to tackle. We can only solve these issues if we work together with the community.

“Local intelligence reported to police is providing useful information for the patrols to follow up, and reinforces how important it is for people to report concerns or issues so we can tackle them.  

Police host drop in sessions

Devon & Cornwall Police are running a series of drop in sessions at St John’s Hall in Penzance where residents and businesses can talk to officers for advice and support if they are concerned about crime and anti-social behaviour.

“We would encourage anyone with concerns about crime and anti-social behaviour in the town to call in at one of our drop-in sessions. It is really important that we have a true picture of what is happening in the area and we rely on the public to tell us what is going on,” said Penzance police inspector, Nicholas Clarke.

Police drop in sessions at St John's Hall are taking place on:

  • Thursday 12 July between 10am and 12noon
  • Tuesday 17 July between 5pm and 7pm
How to report concerns

Residents can report anti-social behaviour to the police online by emailing 101@dc.police.uk or by calling 101 for non-emergencies and in an emergency call 999. If you have information about a crime you can also contact Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111. For concerns about rubbish such as glass and needles on the street, call Cornwall Council Refuse and Recycling on 0300 1234 141 or email refuseandrecycling@cornwall.gov.uk.

 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Chinese delegation visits Cornwall to learn about sustainable tourism

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Thu, 12/07/2018 - 17:53

Sustainable tourism was the focus of a high-level Chinese delegation who recently visited Cornwall.

The delegation from the Hechi province in China came to Cornwall on 11 July 2018 to meet with Cornwall Council, the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly LEP, Visit Cornwall, Cornwall 365 and representatives from the Eden Project.

Led by Mayor Tang Yunshu, the delegation came to Cornwall to learn from Cornwall’s approach to sustainable tourism. Hechi, which has a population of 3.5 million, attracts more than 20 million tourists a year due to its beautiful landscape and favourable climate.

Hechi authorities are looking to ensure that tourism is “all for one” – the Chinese policy term for sustainable tourism that benefits local communities – and were keen to learn from Cornwall’s experience.

Cornwall Council Cabinet Portfolio Holder for the Economy, Bob Egerton, met with and welcomed the Hechi delegation.

“Cooperation of this kind is important in terms of building links between our two regions. It’s an opportunity to exchanging best practice, open doors for business opportunities and for welcoming more Chinese tourists to Cornwall.

“We may be opposite sides of the world, but Cornwall and Hechi actually have a lot in common. We are favourite tourist destinations within each of our countries and share the common challenge of welcoming a significant number of visitors each year while at the same time protecting the natural beauty that brings tourists in the first place,” he said.

The meeting took place at the Eden project, which was an opportunity for the Hechi delegation to see first-hand a large scale Cornish tourist attraction which has sustainability at the centre of its operating model. The delegation also took a guided tour around the county, as part of a fact-finding mission across Europe.

Posted 12 July 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

Chinese delegation visits Cornwall to learn about sustainable tourism

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Thu, 12/07/2018 - 17:53

Sustainable tourism was the focus of a high-level Chinese delegation who recently visited Cornwall.

The delegation from the Hechi province in China came to Cornwall on 11 July 2018 to meet with Cornwall Council, the Cornwall and Isles of Scilly LEP, Visit Cornwall, Cornwall 365 and representatives from the Eden Project.

Led by Mayor Tang Yunshu, the delegation came to Cornwall to learn from Cornwall’s approach to sustainable tourism. Hechi, which has a population of 3.5 million, attracts more than 20 million tourists a year due to its beautiful landscape and favourable climate.

Hechi authorities are looking to ensure that tourism is “all for one” – the Chinese policy term for sustainable tourism that benefits local communities – and were keen to learn from Cornwall’s experience.

Cornwall Council Cabinet Portfolio Holder for the Economy, Bob Egerton, met with and welcomed the Hechi delegation.

“Cooperation of this kind is important in terms of building links between our two regions. It’s an opportunity to exchanging best practice, open doors for business opportunities and for welcoming more Chinese tourists to Cornwall.

“We may be opposite sides of the world, but Cornwall and Hechi actually have a lot in common. We are favourite tourist destinations within each of our countries and share the common challenge of welcoming a significant number of visitors each year while at the same time protecting the natural beauty that brings tourists in the first place,” he said.

The meeting took place at the Eden project, which was an opportunity for the Hechi delegation to see first-hand a large scale Cornish tourist attraction which has sustainability at the centre of its operating model. The delegation also took a guided tour around the county, as part of a fact-finding mission across Europe.

Posted 12 July 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

Council encourages people to Go Wild for Cornwall

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Thu, 12/07/2018 - 14:44

Flowers on Porthcothan Dunes

On World Environment Day (5 June), Cornwall Council is encouraging people to make time for nature and explore Cornwall’s wild side.

The challenge is simple – to #GoWildForCornwall during June by making time to connect with nature, or doing something to help local wildlife.

Cabinet portfolio holder for Environment and Public Protection, Sue James, said the Council was proud to manage and maintain many of Cornwall’s beautiful wild places, as well as deliver environmental initiatives, pollution prevention schemes and diverse natural resources.

"Most people think about the Council as collecting their rubbish but we also support our environment in many other ways to make Cornwall the wonderful place it is. We have celebrated our beaches being awarded blue and seaside flags for cleanliness and safety and we are investing, with partners, in open spaces to make space for nature whilst improving the visiting experience for residents and visitors.

“#GoWildForCornwall aims to highlight the wild things the Council supports and how you can connect with nature and complements the #30Days campaign being run by the Cornwall Wildlife Trust,” she said.

“During June you’ll see information on social media for every generation of nature lovers to explore - from nurturing green spaces to practical tips on how to plant trees and the magic of Cornwall’s hedgerows.

“By working closely with communities, business and environmental organisations to protect our natural environments, we want to make Cornwall a heathier, happier and greener place to live and work – every day of the year.

“Whether you build an insect hotel, smell the wildflowers on a woodland bike ride or just explore a local park, being close to nature can help us feel happier and healthier.”

Categories: Councils, Politics

Council encourages people to Go Wild for Cornwall

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Thu, 12/07/2018 - 14:44

Flowers on Porthcothan Dunes

On World Environment Day (5 June), Cornwall Council is encouraging people to make time for nature and explore Cornwall’s wild side.

The challenge is simple – to #GoWildForCornwall during June by making time to connect with nature, or doing something to help local wildlife.

Cabinet portfolio holder for Environment and Public Protection, Sue James, said the Council was proud to manage and maintain many of Cornwall’s beautiful wild places, as well as deliver environmental initiatives, pollution prevention schemes and diverse natural resources.

"Most people think about the Council as collecting their rubbish but we also support our environment in many other ways to make Cornwall the wonderful place it is. We have celebrated our beaches being awarded blue and seaside flags for cleanliness and safety and we are investing, with partners, in open spaces to make space for nature whilst improving the visiting experience for residents and visitors.

“#GoWildForCornwall aims to highlight the wild things the Council supports and how you can connect with nature and complements the #30Days campaign being run by the Cornwall Wildlife Trust,” she said.

“During June you’ll see information on social media for every generation of nature lovers to explore - from nurturing green spaces to practical tips on how to plant trees and the magic of Cornwall’s hedgerows.

“By working closely with communities, business and environmental organisations to protect our natural environments, we want to make Cornwall a heathier, happier and greener place to live and work – every day of the year.

“Whether you build an insect hotel, smell the wildflowers on a woodland bike ride or just explore a local park, being close to nature can help us feel happier and healthier.”

Categories: Councils, Politics

Mischief Makers set to help Cornwall’s children keep reading through the summer holidays

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Thu, 12/07/2018 - 10:12

Dennis the Menace and Gnasher are leading the fight to keep children reading across Cornwall this summer.

They are part of the Summer Reading Challenge 2018, which aims to get 4-11 year-olds to borrow and read at least six library books during the school holidays.

This year’s theme is Mischief Makers, and has been inspired by the classic childrens’ comic Beano, which celebrates its 80th anniversary this year.

The challenge is designed to prevent children from experiencing a dip in their reading skills during the six-week break from school.

To take part, all children need to do is to visit their local library and sign up for the challenge.

They will then be given a colourful collector’s edition map of Beanotown.

As children read library books for the Summer Reading Challenge, they will receive special stickers, some with mysterious smells.

By adding these stickers to their map, young readers will help Dennis, Gnasher and friends solve clues and discover the treasure, having lots of fun and adventures along the way.

Last year, more than 8,000 children took part in the challenge across Cornwall, with 69% of participants reading at least six books.

This year’s challenge is being delivered as the programme to devolve Cornwall’s library service to local communities continues.

Councillor Edwina Hannaford is Cornwall Council Portfolio holder for Neighbourhoods, and has led the way on the devolution programme.

She said:  “Our libraries allow communities to experience new ideas, can embed a lifelong love of reading and provide a place for communities to gather. 

“That is only being enhanced through the devolution process, as individual libraries react to their local community’s needs.

“It is wonderful to see the latest Summer Reading Challenge being delivered through the network, and I hope this year will prove to be an even bigger success than previous years.”

Jayne Cardew, is Senior Library and Information Assistant at Falmouth Library, which was the first Library and Information Service to transfer to a Town Council as part of devolution programme.

She said: “We had a really great year last year with more children taking part than in previous years but we are hoping that this year will be even better, it’s great to see the enjoyment that children still get from picking up a book and disappearing into it.”

The Summer Reading Challenge 2018 will begin in Libraries across Cornwall on Saturday, 14 July.

Posted 12 July 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics
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