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Council members make decisions on housebuilding, parking and infrastructure at full Council meeting

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Tue, 10/07/2018 - 21:44

Members began today’s (10 July 2018) meeting of the full Council by paying tribute to Cllr Paul Summers who passed away suddenly at the end of May. Members from all parties shared their memories of Paul before standing for a minutes silence to remember the huge contribution he made to the Council and to his community..

Members then debated and made key decisions about housebuilding, parking and infrastructure as well as discussing the proposed new pattern of electoral divisions.  Council Councillors also voted to seek an extension to the consultation about a proposed merger of Devon & Cornwall Police and Dorset Police forces and to seek a full business case before discussing further.

Members agreed to £2.1m for technology improvements in Council car parks as part of the Positive Parking Framework for Cornwall.

The Positive Parking Framework includes a range of measures to improve Council car parks to better meet the needs of users and local communities. This will include simplified tariffs, new machines and barriers so drivers can pay on exit, improved signage and consideration of carers who need to park in areas with restricted parking.

Cornwall Council Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Transport Geoff Brown welcomed the decision: "Upgrading technology so car park users can pay on exit means people can more easily spend time in town centres without having to rush back when their ticket is about to expire. The changes will also free up enforcement officers to focus on tackling drivers who park illegally or cause an obstruction on Cornwall's streets, which is a major frustration for residents. The use of mobile ANPR cameras will enable enforcement officers to carry out mobile patrols around schools and bus stops to reduce indiscriminate parking which is creating road safety concerns.”

Forty-nine Members agreed (46 against, 2 abstentions) to the purchase of a development site at Langarth Farm in Truro so the Council can take a lead in its development and bring forward a high quality housing scheme of 154 homes and set the tone for further development of the area.  The Council plans to deliver a mixture of housing types, including a significant proportion of affordable housing and also housing owned by the Council and rented at market rents.

It was agreed that the Council buys the land for the homes from Sanctuary Housing and another parcel of land nearby which gives the Council the option to build a community facility, such as a school or care facility, or additional housing.

Cornwall Council Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Planning and Economy Bob Egerton said: “This is the first parcel of land that we are proposing to purchase so that the Council can ensure that developments are coordinated for the benefit of all. If the Council did not intervene, we risk some sites being built by individual developers under existing planning permissions.  We could end up with an uncoordinated series of estates without the appropriate infrastructure, or, instead, duplication of infrastructure, to the detriment of the whole community.”

This decision by full Council could pave the way for further proposals to be put forward to the Council to purchase specific parcels of land and to bring forward developments on those sites. The Council will also aim to enter into contractual relationships with other developers who own land there so that the Council can create a masterplan for the whole area.

The Council also agreed the Cornwall Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) Charging Schedule. The CIL will apply to planning applications approved from 01 January 2019 and will raise funds from new housing and commercial developments to be spent on a wide range of infrastructure projects to help communities address the impact of development in Cornwall.  Developers will get certainty up front about the charges they will have to contribute to infrastructure and facilities to support the growth of communities.

Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Planning and Economy, Bob Egerton, said: “It is right that developers help to pay for the facilities that are needed as a result of their development of a piece of land. This levy on new developments will sit alongside existing contributions that developers are required to make, and help to deliver infrastructure where it is most needed, which is not always in the immediate area of the development.

“A proportion (15-25%) of the levy raised in a town or parish council area will be given back to that local council to use in a way that best serves the needs of their communities. The remainder of the money raised will be allocated to support projects across Cornwall. We will shortly be consulting town and parish councils on the most appropriate method for deciding which projects should be supported with CIL monies. A report will be coming to Cabinet later in the year with recommendations on how this should be done.”

The Council also agreed that the Capital Programme be increased to purchase strategic sites to build more homes for local people, including sites in Newquay (Colan Parish) and Launceston, to deliver 675 new homes. The sites will be purchased under the Council’s Housing Development Programme (HDP). 

Agreed earlier this year, the HDP will see the Council investing up to £200 million in directly building and providing 1,000 new homes on sites across Cornwall. The developments will be a mix of homes for private market rental, affordable rent, shared ownership and private market. The first 113 homes to buy or rent, built on pilot sites in Tolvaddon and Bodmin, are set to be ready later this year. 

A new company, wholly owned by the Council, will be set up to buy, let and manage the properties built as part of the HDP. The income generated from the private sales and rentals will subsidise the affordable homes so there is no cost to the Council over the life of the business plan.

The sites in Newquay and Launceston will be added to other housing development sites in Liskeard and Torpoint which the Council already owns.

Cornwall Council Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Homes Andrew Mitchell said:  “We are committed to delivering 1,000 homes for local people.  Cornwall needs more homes – both to rent and to buy - for local people with a genuine housing need. For example, in Newquay there are more than 1,500 applicants on the Homechoice register who have stated Newquay as their first preference.  The development in Newquay could provide up to 400 new homes which will go some way towards addressing that need.

“This is about providing good quality homes that people want to live in, with space, gardens, parking and which are well designed with low energy costs.”

The Council plans to build a mix of property sizes, types and tenures to meet local needs. Some will be for private rent, providing quality, choice and greater security for those in the private rented sector with five-year tenancies as standard. Some will be sold at market prices and others will be for affordable rent or shared ownership.

Members also considered an interim report from the Electoral Review Panel on the Council’s response to the Local Government Boundary Commission for England (LGBCE) draft proposals for a new pattern of electoral divisions in Cornwall.

The LGBCE public consultation runs until 17 September 2018, following which the Commission intends to publish final recommendations for Cornwall Council in December 2018.

 

Story posted 10 July 2018 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Council members make decisions on housebuilding, parking and infrastructure at full Council meeting

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Tue, 10/07/2018 - 21:44

Members began today’s (10 July 2018) meeting of the full Council by paying tribute to Cllr Paul Summers who passed away suddenly at the end of May. Members from all parties shared their memories of Paul before standing for a minutes silence to remember the huge contribution he made to the Council and to his community..

Members then debated and made key decisions about housebuilding, parking and infrastructure as well as discussing the proposed new pattern of electoral divisions.  Council Councillors also voted to seek an extension to the consultation about a proposed merger of Devon & Cornwall Police and Dorset Police forces and to seek a full business case before discussing further.

Members agreed to £2.1m for technology improvements in Council car parks as part of the Positive Parking Framework for Cornwall.

The Positive Parking Framework includes a range of measures to improve Council car parks to better meet the needs of users and local communities. This will include simplified tariffs, new machines and barriers so drivers can pay on exit, improved signage and consideration of carers who need to park in areas with restricted parking.

Cornwall Council Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Transport Geoff Brown welcomed the decision: "Upgrading technology so car park users can pay on exit means people can more easily spend time in town centres without having to rush back when their ticket is about to expire. The changes will also free up enforcement officers to focus on tackling drivers who park illegally or cause an obstruction on Cornwall's streets, which is a major frustration for residents. The use of mobile ANPR cameras will enable enforcement officers to carry out mobile patrols around schools and bus stops to reduce indiscriminate parking which is creating road safety concerns.”

Forty-nine Members agreed (46 against, 2 abstentions) to the purchase of a development site at Langarth Farm in Truro so the Council can take a lead in its development and bring forward a high quality housing scheme of 154 homes and set the tone for further development of the area.  The Council plans to deliver a mixture of housing types, including a significant proportion of affordable housing and also housing owned by the Council and rented at market rents.

It was agreed that the Council buys the land for the homes from Sanctuary Housing and another parcel of land nearby which gives the Council the option to build a community facility, such as a school or care facility, or additional housing.

Cornwall Council Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Planning and Economy Bob Egerton said: “This is the first parcel of land that we are proposing to purchase so that the Council can ensure that developments are coordinated for the benefit of all. If the Council did not intervene, we risk some sites being built by individual developers under existing planning permissions.  We could end up with an uncoordinated series of estates without the appropriate infrastructure, or, instead, duplication of infrastructure, to the detriment of the whole community.”

This decision by full Council could pave the way for further proposals to be put forward to the Council to purchase specific parcels of land and to bring forward developments on those sites. The Council will also aim to enter into contractual relationships with other developers who own land there so that the Council can create a masterplan for the whole area.

The Council also agreed the Cornwall Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) Charging Schedule. The CIL will apply to planning applications approved from 01 January 2019 and will raise funds from new housing and commercial developments to be spent on a wide range of infrastructure projects to help communities address the impact of development in Cornwall.  Developers will get certainty up front about the charges they will have to contribute to infrastructure and facilities to support the growth of communities.

Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Planning and Economy, Bob Egerton, said: “It is right that developers help to pay for the facilities that are needed as a result of their development of a piece of land. This levy on new developments will sit alongside existing contributions that developers are required to make, and help to deliver infrastructure where it is most needed, which is not always in the immediate area of the development.

“A proportion (15-25%) of the levy raised in a town or parish council area will be given back to that local council to use in a way that best serves the needs of their communities. The remainder of the money raised will be allocated to support projects across Cornwall. We will shortly be consulting town and parish councils on the most appropriate method for deciding which projects should be supported with CIL monies. A report will be coming to Cabinet later in the year with recommendations on how this should be done.”

The Council also agreed that the Capital Programme be increased to purchase strategic sites to build more homes for local people, including sites in Newquay (Colan Parish) and Launceston, to deliver 675 new homes. The sites will be purchased under the Council’s Housing Development Programme (HDP). 

Agreed earlier this year, the HDP will see the Council investing up to £200 million in directly building and providing 1,000 new homes on sites across Cornwall. The developments will be a mix of homes for private market rental, affordable rent, shared ownership and private market. The first 113 homes to buy or rent, built on pilot sites in Tolvaddon and Bodmin, are set to be ready later this year. 

A new company, wholly owned by the Council, will be set up to buy, let and manage the properties built as part of the HDP. The income generated from the private sales and rentals will subsidise the affordable homes so there is no cost to the Council over the life of the business plan.

The sites in Newquay and Launceston will be added to other housing development sites in Liskeard and Torpoint which the Council already owns.

Cornwall Council Cabinet Portfolio Holder for Homes Andrew Mitchell said:  “We are committed to delivering 1,000 homes for local people.  Cornwall needs more homes – both to rent and to buy - for local people with a genuine housing need. For example, in Newquay there are more than 1,500 applicants on the Homechoice register who have stated Newquay as their first preference.  The development in Newquay could provide up to 400 new homes which will go some way towards addressing that need.

“This is about providing good quality homes that people want to live in, with space, gardens, parking and which are well designed with low energy costs.”

The Council plans to build a mix of property sizes, types and tenures to meet local needs. Some will be for private rent, providing quality, choice and greater security for those in the private rented sector with five-year tenancies as standard. Some will be sold at market prices and others will be for affordable rent or shared ownership.

Members also considered an interim report from the Electoral Review Panel on the Council’s response to the Local Government Boundary Commission for England (LGBCE) draft proposals for a new pattern of electoral divisions in Cornwall.

The LGBCE public consultation runs until 17 September 2018, following which the Commission intends to publish final recommendations for Cornwall Council in December 2018.

 

Story posted 10 July 2018 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Potholes, 9th July

Potholes left when apparent road surfacing taking place
Nearest road to the pin placed on the map (automatically generated by Bing Maps): 5 Polwithen Drive, Carbis Bay
Report on FixMyStreet
Categories: FixMyStreet

Potholes, 9th July

Ignored when apparent road resurfacing taking place E over two days
Nearest road to the pin placed on the map (automatically generated by Bing Maps): 3 Polwithen Drive, Carbis Bay
Report on FixMyStreet
Categories: FixMyStreet

Tarmac left after apparent road surfacing, 9th July

Machinery parked here left lumps of Tarmac on roads dangerous to cyclist
Nearest road to the pin placed on the map (automatically generated by Bing Maps): 1 Polmennor Drive, Carbis Bay
Report on FixMyStreet
Categories: FixMyStreet

Leftover signage, 9th July

Road closed 5and 6 July Remove signs surfacing did not take place
Nearest road to the pin placed on the map (automatically generated by Bing Maps): 1 Polwithen Drive, Carbis Bay
Report on FixMyStreet
Categories: FixMyStreet

One Cornish Hero spreads the word about Cornish Heroes of the past

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Mon, 09/07/2018 - 18:30

Cornish Heroes 5 Resized

Cornish Hero Edward Rowe (aka Kernow King) has been enthralling school children with tales of amazing Cornish Heroes of the past with the help of Cornwall Council’s Archives and Cornish Studies Service.

Using copies of original documents held in Cornwall Council’s extensive archives, the children explored how we research people and know about the lives of a range of amazing women and men connected to Cornwall, including Emily Hobhouse, John Couch Adams and Henry Trengrouse.

Edward and Jenny Beare brought the stories to life at nine schools with a hilarious play in which they portrayed two archivists who bring ‘the wrong box’ into school and have to improvise their history workshop instead.

Chloe Phillips, Learning Lead for Cornwall Council’s Archives and Cornish Studies Service, said:  “The play and workshop were a great way of us reaching nearly 700 children across Cornwall, and built on our existing outreach programme. Children were inspired and amused by the play, and then fascinated by seeing copies of the real documents and understanding how we find out about Cornish heroes past and present, and how they too could become a Cornish hero and be part of our archive in future.”

As part of the tour, the team visited Roche Community Primary School which marked the first return for Edward Rowe to the school in several decades.

Edward said: “It was a joy for us to perform to schools all around Cornwall and it was a special honour to go back to my primary school in Roche for the penultimate show. My brother and sister, mum and her sister, and nan and all her sisters went to Roche school, so to return after many years since leaving was really wonderful. All the children we performed to were enthralled. They laughed and cheered as they realised some of the world’s greatest women and men came from their home villages and towns”.

Jeremy Walden, Headteacher at Roche Community Primary School, said:  “It was a very, very enjoyable performance. What a fantastic way to bring history to life and make it relevant for our children. A fascinating insight into Cornish history. Thank you.”

Cornwall Council Cabinet portfolio holder for Planning and Economy Bob Egerton said: “It’s great to see talented performers working with our young people to help them appreciate our Cornish Heroes and to encourage in them a thirst for history and heritage.”

The tour was funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund as part of the Kresen Kernow  project to build Cornwall’s new archive centre, which will open in Redruth in 2019.

 

Story posted 09 July 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

One Cornish Hero spreads the word about Cornish Heroes of the past

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Mon, 09/07/2018 - 18:30

Cornish Heroes 5 Resized

Cornish Hero Edward Rowe (aka Kernow King) has been enthralling school children with tales of amazing Cornish Heroes of the past with the help of Cornwall Council’s Archives and Cornish Studies Service.

Using copies of original documents held in Cornwall Council’s extensive archives, the children explored how we research people and know about the lives of a range of amazing women and men connected to Cornwall, including Emily Hobhouse, John Couch Adams and Henry Trengrouse.

Edward and Jenny Beare brought the stories to life at nine schools with a hilarious play in which they portrayed two archivists who bring ‘the wrong box’ into school and have to improvise their history workshop instead.

Chloe Phillips, Learning Lead for Cornwall Council’s Archives and Cornish Studies Service, said:  “The play and workshop were a great way of us reaching nearly 700 children across Cornwall, and built on our existing outreach programme. Children were inspired and amused by the play, and then fascinated by seeing copies of the real documents and understanding how we find out about Cornish heroes past and present, and how they too could become a Cornish hero and be part of our archive in future.”

As part of the tour, the team visited Roche Community Primary School which marked the first return for Edward Rowe to the school in several decades.

Edward said: “It was a joy for us to perform to schools all around Cornwall and it was a special honour to go back to my primary school in Roche for the penultimate show. My brother and sister, mum and her sister, and nan and all her sisters went to Roche school, so to return after many years since leaving was really wonderful. All the children we performed to were enthralled. They laughed and cheered as they realised some of the world’s greatest women and men came from their home villages and towns”.

Jeremy Walden, Headteacher at Roche Community Primary School, said:  “It was a very, very enjoyable performance. What a fantastic way to bring history to life and make it relevant for our children. A fascinating insight into Cornish history. Thank you.”

Cornwall Council Cabinet portfolio holder for Planning and Economy Bob Egerton said: “It’s great to see talented performers working with our young people to help them appreciate our Cornish Heroes and to encourage in them a thirst for history and heritage.”

The tour was funded by the Heritage Lottery Fund as part of the Kresen Kernow  project to build Cornwall’s new archive centre, which will open in Redruth in 2019.

 

Story posted 09 July 2018

Categories: Councils, Politics

Homes for Cornwall partnership celebrate Rural Housing Week at new housing scheme in Madron

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Mon, 09/07/2018 - 14:39

More affordable homes for local people have been delivered as part of Homes for Cornwall, an initiative between Liverty, Cornwall Council, and Galliford Try Partnerships. 

 

The new development in Madron has delivered 24 new homes, including 3 shared ownership homes, 6 homes for affordable rent and 15 to be sold on the open market.  Residents moved into the new homes earlier this year and the development has enabled local families to stay in this beautiful rural area. 

Housing associations and local authorities up and down the country celebrated Rural Housing Week to highlight how new housing can breathe life into rural communities. Rural Housing Week promotes how rural housebuilding can be key to the survival of vital community assets and services, such as schools, post offices and pubs.

Cornwall Council Portfolio holder for Homes, Andrew Mitchell, said: “Building the right kind of housing in the right place is a key commitment for this Council. Developments like this provide people with high quality homes in a location they want, at a price they can afford. Madron is a great example of the Council working with other organisations to reduce our housing pressure and ensure families live comfortably in good quality affordable accommodation, which is one of the commitments we made to the people of Cornwall.”

Madron Development Resized

Executive Director of Development at Liverty, Russell Baldwinson, said: “The homes at Madron provide much needed rural housing for local people. The development is a great example of where rural housing has made a difference to local people, these homes have supported eight families to stay in an area where they have lived and will be contributing to wider services such as local schools and shops.”

As well as the development in Madron, Homes for Cornwall has completed developments in Wadebridge, Shortlanesend and Blackwater, with another 21 affordable homes nearing completion in St Breward following a successful application by Liverty for funding from Homes England (formerly the Homes and Communities Agency). Work has also started to develop the site of the former Cornwall Council offices at St Clare and on the Old Depot site, both in Penzance.

Managing Director Galliford Try Partnerships, Andrew Johnston, commented: “We are passionate about creating vibrant new communities. The considered design, quality build and stunning views make this an exceptional rural scheme. The hard work and strong consultation with the local community has provided a stunning new development that we are extremely proud of and with the new residents settled into their homes, now is the time to celebrate them officially.”

Cornwall Councillor for St Buryan Helen Hawkins said: “We welcome the mixed housing to Madron, and hope such development will improve, or help to replace, missing local services.”

Cllr Graham Tanner from Madron Parish Council said:  “This development has the support of the parish council and we’re especially happy to see the number of affordable homes for local people.”

  

Story posted 09 July 2018

 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Homes for Cornwall partnership celebrate Rural Housing Week at new housing scheme in Madron

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Mon, 09/07/2018 - 14:39

More affordable homes for local people have been delivered as part of Homes for Cornwall, an initiative between Liverty, Cornwall Council, and Galliford Try Partnerships. 

 

The new development in Madron has delivered 24 new homes, including 3 shared ownership homes, 6 homes for affordable rent and 15 to be sold on the open market.  Residents moved into the new homes earlier this year and the development has enabled local families to stay in this beautiful rural area. 

Housing associations and local authorities up and down the country celebrated Rural Housing Week to highlight how new housing can breathe life into rural communities. Rural Housing Week promotes how rural housebuilding can be key to the survival of vital community assets and services, such as schools, post offices and pubs.

Cornwall Council Portfolio holder for Homes, Andrew Mitchell, said: “Building the right kind of housing in the right place is a key commitment for this Council. Developments like this provide people with high quality homes in a location they want, at a price they can afford. Madron is a great example of the Council working with other organisations to reduce our housing pressure and ensure families live comfortably in good quality affordable accommodation, which is one of the commitments we made to the people of Cornwall.”

Madron Development Resized

Executive Director of Development at Liverty, Russell Baldwinson, said: “The homes at Madron provide much needed rural housing for local people. The development is a great example of where rural housing has made a difference to local people, these homes have supported eight families to stay in an area where they have lived and will be contributing to wider services such as local schools and shops.”

As well as the development in Madron, Homes for Cornwall has completed developments in Wadebridge, Shortlanesend and Blackwater, with another 21 affordable homes nearing completion in St Breward following a successful application by Liverty for funding from Homes England (formerly the Homes and Communities Agency). Work has also started to develop the site of the former Cornwall Council offices at St Clare and on the Old Depot site, both in Penzance.

Managing Director Galliford Try Partnerships, Andrew Johnston, commented: “We are passionate about creating vibrant new communities. The considered design, quality build and stunning views make this an exceptional rural scheme. The hard work and strong consultation with the local community has provided a stunning new development that we are extremely proud of and with the new residents settled into their homes, now is the time to celebrate them officially.”

Cornwall Councillor for St Buryan Helen Hawkins said: “We welcome the mixed housing to Madron, and hope such development will improve, or help to replace, missing local services.”

Cllr Graham Tanner from Madron Parish Council said:  “This development has the support of the parish council and we’re especially happy to see the number of affordable homes for local people.”

  

Story posted 09 July 2018

 

Categories: Councils, Politics

Homes for Cornwall partnership celebrate Rural Housing Week at new housing scheme in Madron (3)

Cornwall Council - Latest News - Fri, 06/07/2018 - 18:30

More affordable homes for local people have been delivered as part of  Homes for Cornwall, an initiative between Liverty, Cornwall Council, and Galliford Try Partnerships.  

The new development in Madron has delivered 24 new homes, including 3 shared ownership homes, 6 homes for affordable rent and 15 to be sold on the open market.  Residents moved into the new homes earlier this year and the development has enabled local families to stay in this beautiful rural area.

Housing associations and local authorities up and down the country celebrate Rural Housing Week (2 to 7 July) to highlight how new housing can breathe life into rural communities. Rural Housing Week promotes how rural housebuilding can be key to the survival of vital community assets and services, such as schools, post offices and pubs.

Cornwall Council Portfolio holder for Homes, Andrew Mitchell, said: “Building the right kind of housing in the right place is a key commitment for this Council. Developments like this provide people with high quality homes in a location they want, at a price they can afford. Madron is a great example of the Council working with other organisations to reduce our housing pressure and ensure families live comfortably in good quality affordable accommodation, which is one of the commitments we made to the people of Cornwall.”

Executive Director of Development at Liverty, Russell Baldwinson, said: “The homes at Madron provide much needed rural housing for local people. The development is a great example of where rural housing has made a difference to local people, these homes have supported eight families to stay in an area where they have lived and will be contributing to wider services such as local schools and shops.”

As well as the development in Madron, Homes for Cornwall has completed developments in Wadebridge, Shortlanesend and Blackwater, with another 21 affordable homes nearing completion in St Breward following a successful application by Liverty for funding from Homes England (formerly the Homes and Communities Agency). Work has also started to develop the site of the former Cornwall Council offices at St Clare and on the Old Depot site, both in Penzance.

Managing Director Galliford Try Partnerships, Andrew Johnston, commented: “We are passionate about creating vibrant new communities. The considered design, quality build and stunning views make this an exceptional rural scheme. The hard work and strong consultation with the local community has provided a stunning new development that we are extremely proud of and with the new residents settled into their homes, now is the time to celebrate them officially.

"Cllr Graham Tanner from Madron Parish Council said:  “This development has the support of the parish council and we’re especially happy to see the number of affordable homes for local people.”  

Categories: Councils, Politics
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